Summit County


Resource Planning Priorities

Based on a public opinion survey, the County identified these as the “top 5” resource planning topics for data gathering purposes:

  1. Water Quality and Hydrology
  2. Wilderness
  3. Air Quality
  4. Recreation and Tourism
  5. Wildlife, Fisheries

However, when survey respondents rated 19 categories of resource topics on a 1-10 rating scale, the majority of the topics were rated above the scale midpoint, suggesting that survey respondents support a multiple use approach to county resource management planning. More details of the survey are summarized below.

Summit County’s Natural Resources

The Natural Resources Conservation Service provides the following useful overview of the County’s natural resources:

Existing Resource Planning

Existing federal, state, and county planning documents for Summit County were reviewed to identify existing goals and polices related to the CRMP planning topics. The planning matrix below categorizes the existing goals and policies from these plans by resource topic and can be used as resource in CRMP planning.

MAG Public Survey - Summit County

MAG Public Survey – Summit County

The three MAG counties solicited public comment through an on-line survey, implemented between June 29 and September 9, 2016. The public was notified of the availability of the survey through press releases, public service announcements, public meetings, public events, and other means. There were a total of 133 responses from Summit County residents.

 

Public Land Resource Values

The first survey question asked respondents to rank seven public land resource values from highest to lowest. On average, Summit County respondents ranked “protecting water quality” as the highest of the seven. “Maximizing natural resource development” ranked lowest.

 

Resource Management Planning Priorities

The next question asked respondents about county resource management planning priorities. Respondents rated 19 topics on a 1-10 scale. The majority of the topics were rated above the scale midpoint, suggesting that survey respondents support a multiple use approach to county resource management planning. Consistent with the first survey question, water quality was the highest rated topic. Predator control and mining, energy, and minerals were the only two topics that respondents rated below the scale midpoint. This may possibly indicate that respondents do not perceive these to be major public land issues in Summit County, or that these resources are perceived to be less of a responsibility for the County.

Average Rating on 1-10 Scale (1 = Very Low Priority, 10 = Very High Priority)
Resource Planning TopicSummit CountyUtah CountyWasatch County
Water quality and hydrology9.18.68.5
Air quality8.87.98.4
Forestry and fire management8.37.87.4
Land use7.87.97.5
Wild and scenic rivers8.47.68.1
Wildlife and fisheries8.27.67.6
Wilderness8.47.58.3
Land access7.17.87.5
Recreation and tourism7.47.57.7
Water rights, irrigation, ditches and canals7.57.57.3
Cultural, historical, geological, and paleontological resources7.67.17.4
Threatened, endangered, and sensitive species8.16.97.4
Wetlands and riparian areas8.26.67.3
Floodplains and river terraces7.46.76.8
Law enforcement on public lands6.96.76.6
Noxious weeds7.36.26.5
Agriculture, livestock, and grazing6.26.35.5
Predator control4.65.74.8
Mining, energy, and minerals including distribution3.85.14.0

Top 5 Resource Priorities

In the next survey question, respondents were asked to pick their “top 5” resource priorities from the 19 topics in the previous question. Water quality was the most frequently identified, followed by wilderness, air quality, recreation and tourism, and wildlife and fisheries. Percentages of Summit County respondents selecting each of the 19 topics as one of their “top 5” planning priorities are presented in the graphic below.

Top 5 Resource Planning Topics
Summit CountyPercent
Selecting
 Utah CountyPercent
Selecting
 Wasatch CountyPercent Selecting
Water Quality and Hydrology66.9%Water Quality and Hydrology66.9%Water Quality and Hydrology67.9%
Wilderness48.1%Air Quality42.0%Air Quality47.2%
Air Quality45.9%Land Access42.0%Recreation and Tourism47.2%
Recreation and Tourism36.8%Recreation and Tourism40.6%Land Use47.2%
Wildlife, Fisheries34.6%Land Use39.8%Land Access45.3%

 

Survey Respondents

Of the 133 Summit County respondents, average length of residence in the county was 23 years, 45% were male, and 55% were female. Age of respondents is summarized in the graphic below.
MAG Plan Review Matrix - Summit County

MAG Plan Review Matrix – Summit County

Resource CategorySubcategoryGoals and PoliciesPlanPage
AgricultureRecognize agricultural operations as a significant and important use of the land.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureConsider those land use patterns and strategies that support and protect existing and future agricultural operations; support the development of tools and programs to allow the preservation of productive agricultural lands. Among others these may include agricultural preservation areas, plat notes and other methods to educate new
residents of the agricultural nature of the area, cooperative agreements with landowners, and a program to transfer density from agriculturally productive lands.
Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureEastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureReevaluate and possibly amend the Development Code to streamline the process for designating and modifying Agricultural Protection / Preservation areas.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureCoordinate with the Eastern Summit County Agriculture and Open Space Committee (ESAP) and the affected municipalities in the acquisition of conservation easements and/or restrictions to preserve agricultural lands and open space.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureWork with property owners to maintain working farms and ranches
as a viable industry.
Snyderville Basin General Plan8
AgricultureRecognize agricultural operations as a significant and important use
of the land and protect the rights of those uses.
Snyderville Basin General Plan19
AgricultureFarms of all sizes provide a number of benefits that are critical to our quality of life. They produce food, fiber, nursery stock, and flowers. They clothe us, beautify our surroundings, and supply us with the energy we need everyday. All of these products can be imported from outside Utah, but the cost of transporting them and the concerns with the safety, nutrition and availability of imported products make having the local capacity to produce food very important and beneficial. We do not want to become dependent on foreign sources for such a basic critical need as foodSummit County Resource Assessment and Utah County Resource Assessment18
Air QualityStandardsProtect and improve air quality for protection of public health, environmental health, and scenic visibility.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Air QualityStandardsEnsure National Forest management activities result in meeting state and federal air quality standards, and comply with local, state and federal air quality regulations and requirements.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Air QualityEnsure that development does not contribute significantly to the degradation of air quality and minimizes the impacts of wood burning stoves, automobiles, or other similar air quality pollutants by:
a. Coordinating with the Summit County Health Department to support and implement air quality initiatives.
b. Prohibiting the use of new wood burning appliances and incentivize the replacement of old wood burning devices.
c. Adopting an anti-idling ordinance.
d. Coordinating with the Summit County Engineering Department to amend the Construction Mitigation Plan requirements to ensure mitigation of post emissions on constructions sites.
Snyderville Basin General Plan22
Air QualitySnyderville Basin General Plan22
Air QualityProtect or enhance air quality.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationFully integrate the Heritage Program into land and resource management.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationImplement the National Heritage Strategy emphasizing the need for non-project inventories (Section 110) and public education and awareness programs.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingInventory, evaluate, protect and enhance heritage sites and landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProvide for the revision of existing and development of new inventories of culturally
significant structures, sites, and landmarks within Eastern Summit County.
Eastern Summit County General Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesConsider development of a heritage preservation plan.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesEvaluate the need to adopt a local ordinance that would require, at a minimum,
documentation prior to demolition or alteration of any structures, sites or landmarks
identified in the heritage preservation inventory. If measures beyond documentation
are implemented, consider development of funding sources and/or incentives for
preservation.
Eastern Summit County General Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesIdentify and recognize amenities important to the community heritage of
the Basin and work to preserve such amenities to the greatest extent possible.
Snyderville Basin General Plan19
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesA survey should be conducted to identify heritage amenities.
Identified amenities should be of high priority for preservation through relocation,
adaptive reuse, preservation in place, facade easements, conservation
easements, or other methods.
Snyderville Basin General Plan19
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesSnyderville Basin General Plan20
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesThe County should consider appropriate incentives to property owners for the purposes of preserving heritage amenities.Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect the area's cultural and historical resources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect natural and cultural resources to the extent practicable
within the operational constraints of the reservoir.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect the area's cultural and paleontological resources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProvide interpretation and educa tional opportunities of cultural
and natural resources where appropriate.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicSnyderville Basin General Plan20
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicAvalanche Tracks: Development layout and design should avoid areas which may be adversely affected by avalanche tracks. All known avalanche tracks are declared to be critical areas because of the high probability that development in such hazardous areas may result in property damage, damage to public utilities and roads serving the development, and possible injury or loss of life.Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Economic ConsiderationsMaximize the financial resources available to reinvest in improving and protecting Central Wasatch assets.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 3
Economic ConsiderationsImprove quality of life for residents.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 3
Energy ResourcesEncourage development of renewable resources as a substitute for oil, natural gas, and other limited energy supplies used for electricity generation, and to reduce consumption of these supplies.Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Energy ResourcesWork with appropriate public agencies to permit and approve development of alternative energy.Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Energy ResourcesConsider incentives to encourage green building practices such as LEED or
EnergySTAR certification and use of recycled materials.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Energy ResourcesEncourage community site design techniques that promote sustainable land use practices by:
a. Implementing requirements for lot and building orientation to maximize sustainable design opportunities.
b. Coordinating with the Summit County Building Department to implement incentives for energy efficiency and sustainable site design.
c. Updating the lighting regulations to allow for the newest technologies that allow for the most efficient lighting.
Snyderville Basin General Plan22
Energy ResourcesAllow exploration and subsequent development of oil and gas to meet the
national demand for these resources, consistent with national energy policies
and related demands.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)13
Energy ResourcesMake geothermal steam available for use on a managed and controlled
basis consistent with national energy policies and related demands.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)17
Fire ManagementEcologyIncrease the active use of fire to return fire dependent ecosystems to proper functioning and to reduce hazardous fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Fire ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Fire ManagementEcologyTake timely actions to restore proper functioning of ecosystems after wildfire.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementPreparednessIncrease public understanding and support of the active use of fire to improve watershed and habitat conditions and reduce fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyFire is returned to habitats from which it had been unnaturally excluded, the ?re regime (frequency and intensity) in these habitats generally approximates a natural, pre-settlement regime.Utah Wildlife Action Plan190
Fire ManagementEcologyInappropriate Fire Frequency and Intensity - Fire is excluded from habitats in which potential burns now would be frequent, large, and destructive to soils and native vegetation to the habitats are being actively managed (treated) to reduce components or factors that promote risk of catastrophic ?re, such as cheatgrass, excessive conifer encroachment, or unnaturally large stands of mature Gambel oakUtah Wildlife Action Plan188
Fire ManagementDevelopment layout and design should take
into consideration the risks associated with wildfires.
Snyderville Basin General Plan23
Fire ManagementCoordinate the development and implementation of appropriate
fire management regulations, procedures, and programs.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan6-Mar
Fire ManagementCoordinate the development and implementation of appropriate
fire management regulations, strategies, and programs.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan10-Mar
Fire ManagementThe different landscapes found within the county have become dependent upon fire to maintain the health and vigor of the many ecosystems. With the advent of fire suppression, many ecosystems have departed from pre-suppression conditions. As a result, when fires occur they are often more damaging and cause greater adverse impacts to soil, wildlife habitat, recreational resources, and watersheds.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment11
FisheriesHabitatThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
FisheriesInvasive Speciesimprove the ability of natural resource management entities within Utah to prevent invasion of AIS into the state, and to contain AIS through accepted management practices to areas that are either already infested or become infested.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan18
FisheriesInvasive SpeciesUtah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan19
FisheriesInvasive SpeciesThe Utah AIS Management Plan will facilitate increased interdictions of boats and equipment contaminated with AIS, requiring decontamination under authority of the Utah Aquatic Invasive Species
Interdiction Act and Rule R657-60 Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction in order to control the spread of AIS
Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan21
FisheriesInvasive Speciesfacilitate opportunity to apply contemporary natural resource management practices in order to regulate, control and eradicate AIS, allowing rehabilitation of infested areas followed by documented monitoring of success in all phases of management.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan22
FisheriesBarriersUtah Wildlife Action Plan203
FisheriesBarriersNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
FisheriesBarriersNative ?shes are able to move past water?diversion barriers where necessary or desired.Utah Wildlife Action Plan203
FisheriesFlowsEstablish water allocation policies protecting su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem for aquatic key habitats (especially those with occurrences of SGCNs).Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
FisheriesFlowsNatural hydrographs (timing, duration, temperature, etc) are restored or mimicked in priority stream reaches below dams and reservoirs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan205
FisheriesHabitatAquatic key habitats (especially at those locations important for SGCNs) contain su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem that supports the conservation target(s).Utah Wildlife Action Plan196
FisheriesHabitatComplex habitats and ?oodplain connections are restored or maintained in selected rivers/streams.Utah Wildlife Action Plan199
FloodplainsFloodplains: All areas within a 100-year floodplain, or where the prevailing or potential natural vegetation is riparian, are declared to be critical to the maintenance of the basin's hydrologic systems, fisheries and wildlife habitat. Development of floodplain areas has a significant potential to adversely affect wildlife, water quality, and, if it modifies the floodway, adjoining, upstream and downstream properties, roads and other public facilities. Development in floodplain areas may also be constrained by a high water table which raises the cost of installing and maintaining utilities. Finally, floodplain development adversely affects all taxpayers through public expenditures to prevent or clean up damages due to floods.Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Forest ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain and/or restore tall forb communities to mid seral or potential natural community (PNC) status.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore as mature and old age classes 40% of total conifer and 30% of total aspen cover types, well distributed across the landscape.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore species composition, such that the species that occupy any given site are predominantly native species in the kind and amount that were historically distributed across the landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Forest ManagementProductsUse timber harvest where allowed, to contribute to the economy while achieving properly functioning conditions of vegetation and watersheds.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
IrrigationPromote advanced irrigation techniques, including the
use of wastewater on golf courses and other large irrigated areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Land AccessPlanningThe Central Wasatch transportation system is integrated within the fabric of community values and lifestyle choices, supports land use objectives, and connects to the overall regional network. We meet the growing demand for access to and within the Central Wasatch Mountains through a dynamic and sustainable multi-modal mountain transportation system that provides year-round transportation choices to residents, visitors and employees, improves safety and efficiency, and is compatible with the unique environmental characteristics of the Central Wasatch.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 5
Land AccessPlanningProvide integrated multimodal transportation choices for residents, visitors, and employees.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 5
Land AccessPlanningEnsure the transportation experience is reliable and facilitates a positive experience.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 5
Land AccessPlanningEnsure the transportation experience is safe and promotes health.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 5
Land AccessPlanningThe transportation system supports the natural and intrinsic values of the Central Wasatch.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 5
Land AccessRecreationPursue the most appropriate and feasible means of securing legal public access to critical recreational opportunities while mitigating conflicts on privately-owned landsMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Land AccessRecreationEstablish appropriate levels of access and designed settings in harmony with the desired recreation experience.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Land AccessPlanningAcquire access and rights-of-way for general public and administrative use.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningMinimize the addition of special use encumbered areas of National Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land AccessRight of WayEfforts will be made to obtain right-of-ways for public access to the National Forest. Existing right-of ways will be maintained. A priority for right-of-ways will be the linkages to community trails along the front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-135
Land AccessRight of WayRegional trails, such as the Great Western Trail and the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will be recognized and valued as unique opportunities to develop recreation corridors across multiple ownerships in the face of expanding development across potential trail corridors.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-160
Land AccessRight of WayOgden area in cooperation with the cities of North Ogden, Pleasant View and Willard. Needed access and rights of way will be maintained or acquired to complete the Bonneville Shoreline trail along the Wasatch Front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-146
Land AccessPreserve and create appropriate motorized and non-motorized trails and access to
public land in conjunction with the municipalities and US Forest Service. The
intention is not to require property owners who live adjacent to the National Forest to
provide public access.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Land AccessThe County recognizes the importance of the natural resources within
the Basin and the surrounding areas and desires to preserve and maintain access to
these scenic areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Land AccessPreserve public access to riparian corridors and fishable streams,
including East Canyon Creek and Silver Creek Drainage (post remediation), for
fishing, bird watching, wildlife viewing, and other passive recreational interests.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Land AccessEncourage and obtain access to the forest lands to promote hiking,
mountain biking, bird watching, wildlife viewing and other similar non-motorized
activities. All new development adjacent to these areas should ensure appropriate
access to the back country through trail connections and open space view
corridors.All new development adjacent to these areas should ensure appropriate
access to the back country through trail connections and open space view
corridors. Provide adequate trailheads and parking to facilitate resident and visitor
access to these backcountry areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Land AccessSnyderville Basin General Plan18
Land AccessProvide for convenient, manageable, and controlled public access
to the recreational facilities, the reservoir, and the Weber River.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land AccessMaintain appropriate and reasonable access for existing private
landowners and visitors.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan10-Mar
Land UseEcologyPreserve additional lands to avoid loss of critical conservation values, and restore existing degraded landsMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Land UseEcologyMitigate the severity of climate change and develop adaptive capacity to reduce vulnerabilities to local climate change impactsMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Land UseEconomic considerationsDevelop legal, regulatory, financial and integrated governance structures that provide long-term and sustainable support for achieving the environment system goals.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Land UseEconomic considerationsEstablish an organization, with authority to act based on public support, that fosters long-term success of the Central Wasatch recreation system by promoting collaborative and united management, user education, and acquisition of ongoing funding for continued system maintenance, evolution, and managementMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Land UseStandards/zoningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land UseUtility corridorsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRecognize and manage for the importance of scenic forest landscapes to overall recreation settings as well as to the quality of life for communities adjacent to the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRestore, maintain or enhance landscape scenic integrity across the variety of landscape character themes found on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land UseJurisdiction/exchangesupgrade school and institutional trust land assets where prudent by exchange.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitymanage school and institutional trust lands for their highest and best trust land use.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitymaximize the commercial gain from trust land uses for school and institutional trust lands consistent with long-term support of beneficiariesSITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitypermit other land uses or activities not prohibited by law which do not constitute a loss of trust assets or loss of economic opportunity.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseOpen spaceOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
Land UseStandards/zoningFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
Land UseEnsure that development occurs in a manner and location that protects natural
resources, including but not limited to pollution prevention, erosion prevention,
national forests, crucial wildlife habitat and corridors, agricultural lands, fisheries,
water quality, wetlands, scenic view sheds, riparian areas, wildlife and clean air.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Land UseEnsure that land is appropriately reclaimed and restored following the conclusion of
disruptive activities.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Land UseOpen SpaceOpen space should be maintained and preserved according to its
classification: Pristine, Managed-Recreational, Active, Internal Public Space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceConservation easements, deed restrictions, trail easements, and/or
plat notes should be recorded confirming the purpose of the land and identifying
restrictions.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceAppropriate ownership and management entity, either public or
private, should be determined at time of preservation.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceWhen open space lands benefit only a single development with limited to
no public access, those lands should remain under private ownership.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceWhen open space lands are preserved that benefit the greater community
and allow for greater public access and civic needs, those should be
owned and managed by a public entity.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceSnyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceOpen spaces should have a management plan that identifies operations
and maintenance needs, including noxious weed control, on the property
to ensure that its purposes are fulfilled.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceManagement of Pristine Open Spaces should minimize the use of
chemical treatments, machinery, and vehicles in an effort to avoid impacts
on the open space, water quality, and air quality, and minimizes noise.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceConcurrency policies should be in place for public entities to assure community recreation facilities and open spaces have adequate funding to address the impacts of future growth. Implementation of this policy should require that fees be collected in order to ensure that both residential and commercial projects contribute their proportional share.Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceMechanisms, programs, and strategies should be in place to preserve
lands as open space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceSnyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should develop on-going revenue sources earmarked for
open space preservation including partnership with the Snyderville Basin Special
Recreation District in providing opportunities for voter authorization of bond funds
and concurrency programs.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should establish formal mechanisms for holding and
transferring land and development rights from high priority open space areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should consider amending the zoning map and Code to
support growth and development in identified mixed use areas to alleviate
development pressure on land that meets the descriptions of open space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should accept cash-in-lieu of open space where such
funds can be more appropriately used to purchase development rights or open
space at a more appropriate or significant location.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should establish and maintain cooperative strategies
with local land trusts and, when possible, partner with other public, non-profit and
private entities and/or other qualified land conservation groups to achieve the
preservation of priority open spaces.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceAn adequate amount of open space should be preserved for all new
developments and should be identified during the development review process.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceCritical Lands may be counted towards the minimum required open
space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceWhile development should meet the open space requirements, it
may be appropriate in large lot developments to allow limited open space to be
incorporated into individual lots, provided that the open space is outside of
fenced areas and is contiguous to Pristine or Managed-Recreational open space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceOpen space that is required to be set aside in each development
should, whenever possible, be contiguous to adjacent open space and protect
hillsides and natural resources.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UsePreservation: Work with developers to ensure that Critical Lands are
properly identified within proposed project areas and preserved and avoided to
the greatest extent possible.
Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Land UseCritical Lands Density: Development on Critical Lands is allowed at
base density. No density incentives for development should be granted for
preserving Critical Lands.
Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Land UseCritical Lands: Critical Lands defined in Chapter 11 of the Code are
those lands which:
a. Have slopes of thirty percent (30%) or greater, or
b. Have geologic hazards and avalanche tracks, or
c. Are within a 100-year flood plain, or
d. Are Jurisdictional Wetlands as defined by the Army Corps of Engineers, or
e. Are on ridgelines.
Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Land UseVisual/aestheticsBecause of the importance of aesthetics to the
economic viability of the Basin, views from the designated roadways (Interstate
80, State Roads 224 and 248, and US-40) are critical and ridgeline
encroachment should be avoided.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Land UseStudy and implement an urban landscaping
management plan to be included in the Development Code to ensure the ongoing
health of the community flora.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Land UseDetermine whether retention or disposal will be in the best public
interest.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)8
Land UseVisualProtect and enhance visual resources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Land UseComply with relevant laws for the protection of sensitive areas
and the natural environment.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Land UseRestore and maintain healthy, diverse plant communities through
revegetation and minimizing disturbance.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Land UseIdentify areas and resources deemed unsuitable for development
or inconsistent with Reclamation management objectives.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land UseControl erosion where practicable.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land UseConsistent with the reservoir's operating criteria, identify
appropriate and compatible land uses that benefi t the public.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land UseMaintain appropriate land managanent strategies and guidelines
for planning area purposes including: access, roads, trails,
utilities, and other land uses and activities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land UseRecognize the unique resources and characteristics of specific
areas. Develop and maintain appropriate guidelines for the
management of these resources and uses.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land UseClarify and resolve land ownership, property boundary, and
resource management issues and responsibilities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Land UseManage to effectively control pollution sources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan10-Mar
Law EnforcementIncrease Forest Service field presence in key areas, improve effectiveness of public information on restrictions, and increase participation of individuals and organized groups in monitoring uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Law EnforcementProvide a safe environment for users, adequate law enforcement,
and encourage appropriate uses.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Law EnforcementCoordinate and enforce appropriate laws and policy, waste and
fire management regulations, and facilities in recreational areas.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Livestock and GrazingManage livestock grazing levels and operations on suitable lands for sustainable forage use within properly functioning conditions.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Livestock and GrazingGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
Livestock and GrazingMaintain and/or improve livestock forage on NRL and place under custodial
management all tracts of NRL 40 acres or more in size.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)18
Livestock and GrazingThe rangelands of Summit County are a very important part of the livestock management system for the state of Utah. The rangeland in this county serves as critical summer range for sheep and cattle all across northern Utah, as well as habitat for elk, deer, and moose.Summit County Resource Assessment10
Livestock and Grazingresource concerns can be remedied utilizing existing rangeland management techniques, including implementing improved rotational grazing systems, implementing brush management to reduce canopy cover of cedar, integrated pest management, and range planting in areas of heavy infestation of noxious plants.Summit County Resource Assessment10
Mineral ResourcesMake available and encourage development of lead, zinc, silver, gold and
cadmium to meet the national demand and boost the local economy.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)16
Mineral ResourcesEnsure mineral development occurs appropriately.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Noxious WeedsGreatly reduce known infestations of noxious weeds and rigorously prevent their introduction and/or spread.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Noxious WeedsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Noxious weedsAppropriately manage existing and invasive weeds in Utah through: A) education and research; B) Mapping and monitoring; C) Prevention, early detection, and rapid response; D) Control - integrated weed management; E) Restoration; F) Regulation and enforcement; G) Funding.Utah Strategic Plan for Managing Noxious and Invasive Weeds18
Noxious WeedsInvasive plant dominance/presence is reduced or eliminated in locations or habitats where such an outcome is realistic (ecologically and economically).Utah Wildlife Action Plan228
Noxious WeedsUtah Wildlife Action Plan226
Noxious weedsEstablished noxious weed infestations are not increasing or are reduced to low densities. New invader species are not becoming established. New infestations of species are contained or reduced. New populations of existing noxious weeds are eradicated or reduced in highly susceptible, often disturbed areas. Native plants dominate most landscapes that have been rehabilitated.Wasatch-Cache National Forest Noxious Weed Treatment Program:DEIS1/15/2016
Noxious weedsRequire long-term management plans for all designated open space areas. Pursue an
aggressive weed control program that addresses noxious weeds.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Noxious weedsImplement integrated pest management strategies.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Noxious weedsWeeds are a problem for everyone. Federal, state, and local agencies and private landowners are responsible for the noxious weeds present on their lands. Prevention, early detection, control, and eradication of noxious weeds are the most practical means of weed management.Summit County Resource Assessment, Wasatch County Resource Assessment5
Predator ControlMaintain a healthy cougar population within their current distribution while considering human safety, economic concerns, other wildlife species, and maintaining hunting traditions through 2025.Utah Cougar Management Plan3
Predator ControlThe DWR predator-control program provides incentives for hunters to remove coyotes. Primary goal of the program is to remove coyotes from areas where they may prey on mule deer. Participants receive $50 for each properly documented coyote that they kill in Utah.Utah Predator Control Program Summary 2014-20150
Predator ControlDepleted native species whose populations require relief from native predators, receive assistance for as long as they need it, and no longer.Utah Wildlife Action Plan240
Predator ControlUtah Wildlife Action Plan240
Predator ControlPredator control is vital to the establishment of sage-grouse and other threatened and endangered species. It is observed that the increase in predators, through their protection, has resulted in the decrease of the sensitive species that wildlife agencies are trying to protect. Proper management practices can be used to control predators and protect sensitive species.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment9
Recreation and TourismPlanningThe recreation system in the Central Wasatch is balanced, sustainable, and provides a range of settings that accommodates increasing demand for year-round outdoor recreation opportunities while protecting solitude, naturalness, and other backcountry values by encouraging stewardship and high levels of use at thoughtfully designed locations with convenient access.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Recreation and TourismPlanningPreserve special, unique recreation areas and settings to maintain opportunities for solitude and naturalness.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Recreation and TourismPlanningBy 2040, the Central Wasatch Mountains achieve a balance of broadly shared economic growth, high-quality development and high-value transportation infrastructure that is attractive, sustainable, and provides opportunity for visitors and residents. The Central Wasatch brand is clearly differentiated as high quality, convenient, and unique in the world, with diverse use and access options. Prioritized protection of natural and scenic resources ensures that quality of life and quality of experience are enhanced over the long term.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 3
Recreation and TourismPlanningImprove the quality of experience for residents and visitors.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 3
Recreation and TourismPlanningIdentify and establish high use areas to focus where future growth in recreation occurs.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Recreation and TourismTourismGrow the year-round, destination-based travel, tourism, and recreation economy.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 3
Recreation and TourismTrailsProvide a well-designed, appropriately maintained, well-signed, and interconnected trail network that meets demand and can adapt to evolving uses.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 6
Recreation and TourismCoordination/partnershipsInvolve Forest users in developing strategies for managing recreation to meet desired future conditions and address recreation pressures and demands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease Forest recreation user stewardship of resources and strengthen awareness of user ethics for reducing resource and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismParks/facilitiesEncourage private enterprise to develop recreational facilities on and off the Forest that provide for a range of recreation opportunities (e.g. camping and picnicking areas, trailheads, and interpretive sites).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage for an array of recreation opportunities and settings to improve the quality of life for a variety of Forest recreation users. Balance growth and expansion of recreation by managing within the capability of sustainable ecosystems found on the Forest for today and the future.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismTourismUse ski area associated private and public developed recreation facilities to provide world-class skiing and mountain resort opportunities while contributing to the economy.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Recreation and TourismTrailsAcquire lands or easements needed to facilitate Bonneville Shoreline and Great Western Trails development.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Recreation and TourismTrailsManage trails to provide desired recreation opportunities for recreation users and to meet Forest Service standards.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage recreation use of undeveloped areas on the forest to provide for desirable opportunities while preventing or reducing resource impacts and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage uses of new recreational technologies to provide for opportunities while preventing or minimizing negative social and/or resource impacts on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Recreation and TourismUser groupsWork closely with city, county, state and tribal governments to provide for integrated, coordinated development and management (including enforcement) of OHV activities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Recreation and TourismEconomic considerationsState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismUser groupsState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismUser groupsState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease opportunities for viewing mule deer while educating the public concerning the needs of deer and the importance of habitat and other limiting factors.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationProvide a diversity of high-quality hunting and viewing opportunities for mule deer throughout the state.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan20
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationResponsible recreation is promoted and encouraged via e?ective education and enforcement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan178
Recreation and TourismUser groupsRecreational opportunities (OHV) are designed and presented in ways that encourage and promote responsible participation, while also ensuring that wildlife and habitat impacts are kept at acceptably low levels.Utah Wildlife Action Plan177
Recreation and TourismSnyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismCommunity parks, trails and recreation facilities should be of
sufficient size and located throughout the Basin in a manner that ties the
neighborhoods together and promotes the overall sense of community and
recreation family.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismEnsure that recreation opportunities in the Basin grow in parallel with
future growth.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismContinue to seek opportunities for public parks, recreational open
spaces, trails and recreation facilities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismAnticipate the need for future public park and recreation system improvements through a continuing review of existing inventory, analysis, and evaluation of resources.Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismAssess resident needs based on periodic community interest and
opinion surveys conducted by Basin Recreation to help determine priorities for
recreation facilities and track trends.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismFoster regional recreational planning and interagency cooperation of
public entities to collaborate on long term capital facility planning goals and
development of joint use facilities to efficiently serve the taxpayers of the greater
Park City community.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismSnyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismWork toward achieving an effective balance of Managed-
Recreational Open Space preservation while meeting the need for active park
space to include developed sports fields and support buildings.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismSnyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismSnyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismSecure public trail easements in an effort to carry out the community
vision, implement the Trails Master Plan, and create a complete network of
interconnected multi-use non-motorized trails in cooperation with other public and
private entities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismSnyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismTrail system improvements should be designed with the intent to
protect and enhance environmentally sensitive areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismEnsure adequate capacity is provided at trailheads located throughout the Basin to provide points of staging and support facilities to serve multiple user groups.Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismEncourage neighborhood recreation facilities that are intended to serve
neighborhoods or individual developments. These facilities should be designed to
enhance a neighborhood as a part of good project design and to provide a higher
quality of life for the residents. Neighborhood facilities are not intended to attract
persons from the community as a whole, but rather function as public gathering places
within the neighborhood.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismDevelopment should provide for the reasonable recreational needs of
residents within a development project, which may include construction of
neighborhood parks, internal trail systems, or other recreation facilities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismNeighborhood parks, trails and/or recreation facilities are most
appropriately developed and managed by individual developers or
neighborhood/homeowner associations. These spaces should be easily accessible
and help strengthen the identity of the neighborhood.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismThe Code should establish reasonable standards for parks and
recreational amenities specifically designed to serve the neighborhood or project
level demand.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismSnyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismWhere appropriate, ensure that adequate capacity is provided at
trailheads within the development project or neighborhood to provide points of
staging and support facilities to serve multiple user groups. Trailheads within a
development project or neighborhood that provide access to the Community-Wide
Trail System may be accepted for dedication by Basin Recreation.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismRecognize the desirability of multiple types of recreational services to
meet the broad range of health, wellness and leisure interests of Basin residents and
visitors. Several different types of opportunities exist to meet this need.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismPrivate commercial ventures are an important aspect of providing recreation services for residents and visitors of the Basin. They typically operate as independent businesses that provide facilities, amenities and programs. Ski and golf resorts, commercial outfitters and sports, health, wellness and fitness clubs fall into this category.Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismNon-profit recreation entities are organizations established for the
purpose of developing recreation amenities and/or providing programs that
complement the purpose and goals of public and private recreation sectors. Utah
Athletic Foundation and National Ability Center are examples of these entities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismWinter recreational opportunities, such as Nordic skiing, snow
shoeing, dog sledding, and the like should be encouraged. Care should be taken
to ensure that these activities are located sensitively, avoiding sensitive wildlife
habitat.
Snyderville Basin General Plan18
Recreation and TourismProvide for an increase and diversity of quality and quantity recreational
experiences while: (1) Providing outdoors recreation opportunities for
all individuals; (2) Maintaining proper outdoor recreation standards of
open space; (3) Minimizing environmental degradation wherever possible.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)21
Recreation and TourismPursue and support partnerships to enhance recreation services
and facilities compatible with project purposes.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan6-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide the public with opportunities to learn about proper
recreation etiquette and safety.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan6-Mar
Recreation and TourismMaintain and enhance the quality and diversity of recreational
opportunities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide recreation opportunities consistent and compatible with
the purposes of the planning area and other resource needs.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Recreation and TourismBalance providing recreation opportunities with protecting
environmental resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide adequate facilities and management to accommodate
uses while protecting the natural resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide accessible facilities and recreational sites for persons with
disabilities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide adequate services and recreation facilities to protect
public health and safety.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide a variety of recreaional opportunities without
compromising the quality of the recreation experience.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Recreation and TourismAllow other entities to provide recreation oriented operation and
maintenance, administration, and/ or vendor services, where
appropriate.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Recreation and TourismEvaluate the impact of recreation activities on Rockport Reservoir
and surrounding lands.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Recreation and TourismManage recreational uses as necessary to protect water quality
and sensitive resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
Recreation and TourismManage land-based motor vehicles and recreational uses as
necessary to protect water quality and sensitive resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan10-Mar
Riparian AreasProtect and restore functioning and connected aquatic and terrestrial habitats and ecosystems.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatEnhance an average of 25,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat in
Sage-grouse Management Areas annually.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatIncrease the total amount of sage-grouse habitat acreage within Sage-grouse Management Areas by an average of 50,000 acres per year, through management actions targeting Opportunity Areas. Opportunity Areas are areas which offer the best potential for creating new habitat for greater sage-grouse.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect 10,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat on private and School
and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) lands annually through conservation covenants, leases, easements or other legal tools, with emphasis on the best-of-the-best populations.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect, maintain, improve and enhance sage-grouse populations and habitats within the established Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viable [greater sage-grouse] populations within each SGMA.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilitySustain an average male lek count of 4100 males (based on a ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) in the Sage-grouse Management Areas, and increase the population of males to an average of 5000 (based on the same ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) within the Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatMaintain pollinators and minimize impacts to pollinators or their habitats.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationIncrease understanding of and support research on the distribution, ecology, and threats to plant species at risk, nonvascular plants and rare plant communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain or restore viability of populations of species at risk, Watch List Plants, and rare communitiesRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viability of species-at-risk (including endangered, threatened and sensitive species and unique communities).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityManage Forest Service sensitive species to prevent them from being classified as threatened or endangered and where possible provide for delisting as sensitive (FSM 2670).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticAquatic key habitats (especially at those locations important for SGCNs) contain su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem that supports the conservation target(s).Utah Wildlife Action Plan196
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticComplex habitats and ?oodplain connections are restored or maintained in selected rivers/streams.Utah Wildlife Action Plan199
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticEstablish water allocation policies protecting su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem for aquatic key habitats (especially those with occurrences of SGCNs).Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticUtah Wildlife Action Plan198
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticUtah Wildlife Action Plan203
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticNatural hydrographs (timing, duration, temperature, etc) are restored or mimicked in priority stream reaches below dams and reservoirs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan205
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatUtah Wildlife Action Plan226
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatRecreational opportunities (OHV) are designed and presented in ways that encourage and promote responsible participation, while also ensuring that wildlife and habitat impacts are kept at acceptably low levels.Utah Wildlife Action Plan177
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationResponsible recreation is promoted and encouraged via e?ective education and enforcement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan178
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect threatened and endangered species and minimize impacts
to sensitive resources and areas including wetland and stream
corridors.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatEnhance an average of 25,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat in
Sage-grouse Management Areas annually.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatIncrease the total amount of sage-grouse habitat acreage within Sage-grouse Management Areas by an average of 50,000 acres per year, through management actions targeting Opportunity Areas. Opportunity Areas are areas which offer the best potential for creating new habitat for greater sage-grouse.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect 10,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat on private and School
and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) lands annually through conservation covenants, leases, easements or other legal tools, with emphasis on the best-of-the-best populations.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect, maintain, improve and enhance sage-grouse populations and habitats within the established Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viable [greater sage-grouse] populations within each SGMA.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilitySustain an average male lek count of 4100 males (based on a ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) in the Sage-grouse Management Areas, and increase the population of males to an average of 5000 (based on the same ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) within the Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyProtect and restore functioning and connected aquatic and terrestrial habitats and ecosystems.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedProtect, maintain and improve watershed health, water supply, and water quality.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or improve water quality to provide stable and productive riparian and aquatic ecosystems.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore overall watershed health (proper functioning of physical, biological and chemical conditions). Provide for long term soil productivity. Watershed health should be addressed across administrative and political boundaries.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore stream channel integrity, channel processes, and sediment regimes (timing, volume, character of sediment input/transport) under which riparian & aquatic ecosystems developed.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain water in streams, lakes, and wetlands of adequate quantity and quality to provide for instream flows and existing downstream uses including support of healthy riparian & aquatic habitats, stability & effective function of stream channels, ability to route flood discharges, and to maintain recreation opportunities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsProtect waters meeting or surpassing State water quality standards by planning and designing land management activities to protect
water quality.
Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedDesign and implement watershed management programs and plans that will restore water quality and watershed function to support beneficial uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain and/or restore soil productivity to improve watershed functioning through managing ground cover, soil compaction, and vegetation.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedIdentify [watershed] areas not in properly functioning condition. Improve plant species composition, ground cover and age class diversity in these areas.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyUtah Wildlife Action Plan197
Water Quality and HydrologyImplement strategies to ensure that there is adequate quality and quantity of water for
all new development, and require water conservation and quality plans.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Water Quality and HydrologyCoordinate with the Summit County Health
Department to ensure watershed areas and well sources are protected through
the implementation of Development Code amendments.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Water Quality and HydrologyDevelop a plan to implement strategies to
construct/upgrade public sewer facilities. Where public systems are not available,
promote the utilization of advanced wastewater systems.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Water Quality and HydrologyCoordinate with the Summit County Engineering
Department to encourage sustainable and efficient storm water management
practices.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Water Quality and HydrologyImprove water quality in the Drain Tunnel Creek and McHenry Canyon drainages
by reducing the sulfate concentration from approximately 800 to 50
mg/l in McHenry Canyon, and from approximately 185 to 30 mg/l in Drain
Tunnel Creek.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)20
Water Quality and HydrologyEncourage partnerships designed to promote public awareness of
the purpose of Rockport Reservoir; the importance of watershed
protection; and the public's role in maintaining or improving
water quality and protecting environmental, natural, historical
and cultural resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan6-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyPursue and support partnerships to maintain or enhance water
quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan6-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect or improve water for storage, quality, and delivery.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologySupport and participate in management efforts to maintain and
improve water quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyEducate the public on the purpose of Rockport Reservoir, the
importance of watershed protection, and the public's role in
improving and maintaining water quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyManage to protect project purposes, and water operation
contracts and provisions.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyMaintain or improve the condition of watersheds and reservoir
water quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyMaintain or improve culinary water sources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyManage to effectively control pollution sources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan7-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyThe quality and conservation of water that originates and is stored in the county is important to the residents of Summit County as well as to the residents of the greater Wasatch Front.Summit County Resource Assessment6
Water RightsUtah Wildlife Action Plan197
WetlandsThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
WetlandsProtect and restore functioning and connected aquatic and terrestrial habitats and ecosystems.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsUtah Wildlife Action Plan197
WetlandsJurisdictional Wetlands are declared to be critical since development in wetland areas has a significant adverse effect on
water quality, the rate and volume of storm water discharge, and wildlife.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
WetlandsAllow further studies to determine if wetlands can be used to
red uce non-point source pollution.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
WildernessManage Wildernesses recognizing differences in population proximity and consequent role in providing wilderness experiences for more people.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
WildlifeHabitatThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics 4
WildlifeMaintain and improve big game wintering habitat in the Walsburg Game Range.Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)19
WildlifeHabitatEvaluate areas with potential for Research Natural Area designation including Ben Lomond Peak (tall forb values), western portion of the Deseret Peak Wilderness (Great Basin community types and cryptogamic crusts).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
WildlifeHabitatMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide adequate habitat components for sustainable big game populations coordinated with State wildlife management agencies, private lands and other resource needs and priorities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide suitable habitat for prey species such as hares, squirrels, and small mammals.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifePopulation managementProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WildlifeHabitatEvaluate areas with potential for Research Natural Area designation including Ben Lomond Peak (tall forb values), western portion of the Deseret Peak Wilderness (Great Basin community types and cryptogamic crusts).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
WildlifeHabitatMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide adequate habitat components for sustainable big game populations coordinated with State wildlife management agencies, private lands and other resource needs and priorities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide suitable habitat for prey species such as hares, squirrels, and small mammals.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifePopulation managementProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WildlifeCoordinate resource management, habitat enhancement activities,
and projects with private, local, state, and federal organizations
and agencies to optimize environmental benefits. Establish
partnerships to protect, manage, and conserve wildlife habita t
and species.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan6-Mar
WildlifeProtect resources essential to fish and wildlife habitat and
population.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
WildlifeProtect and enhance the quality of fish and wildlife habitat within
the framework of existing laws and management authority.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan8-Mar
WildlifeMaintain a healthy vegetative community through appropriate
management strategies.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan9-Mar
WildlifeEnsure the protection of wildlife and habitat from adverse impacts of development by:
a. Coordinating with the Utah State Division of Wildlife Resources to map critical winter and summer ranges, birthing areas, and migration corridors.
Snyderville Basin General Plan23
WildlifeHabitat-improvement projects often take a few years to pay off, but over the long term, this effort will result in healthier deer populations statewide.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment and Utah County Resource Assessment8
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan17
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan17-18
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan18
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan18
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan30-31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Water Quality and HydrologyUtah Forest Action Plan48
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan54
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan55
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan55
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan58
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan66
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Water Quality and HydrologyUtah Forest Action Plan72
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan73
Riparian AreasUtah Forest Action Plan73
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan73
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan74
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan76
AgriculturePrime, important and unique agricultural lands and soils are vital to sustain human life. The protection of prime agricultural lands should be given the same consideration as other lands by federal agencies, the State of Utah, and its political subdivisions. It is important these lands be conserved for our food security needs.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureDevelop legislative policy that provides protection for important agricultural lands and soils equal to wetlands in order to sustain food security.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureFund conservation easement legislation that gives priority to important productive agricultural lands with prime soils or important farmlands. Dedicate greenbelt rollback monies to conservation easements or other productive agricultural uses within the counties where rollback funds are generated. Enable local conservation districts to make recommendations to county commissions related to the use of annual rollback funds.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide new monies to the LeRay McAllister Fund to match funds for conservation easements on productive agricultural lands with prime state or locally-important soils.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureCreate a separate greenbelt designation for smaller-acreage productive operations.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAmend Utah law to fund mitigation of agriculture lands lost to eminent domain.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAmend Utah law to encourage energy producers to use directional drilling and other techniques to minimize the surface impacts on agricultural lands caused by energy development.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide a $1,000,000 increase in money from the State of Utah General Fund for invasive species mitigation, especially weed control.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureConsider other sources of funding for weed control tied to the spread of weed seeds including: funds earned from unclaimed property, trailer licenses, noxious weed impact fees from recreational ATVs, gravel pit fee assessments, a portion of the sportsmen fees gathered by the Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other appropriate sources.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide $1,000,000 of on-going state funding to increase landscape-scale coordinated resource management planning. Where feasible, this money will facilitate the development of grazing management plans, watering facilities, fencing improvements, weed control, and other grazing improvement projects.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAugment existing funding or develop alternative funding sources to improve and update irrigation system technologies.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureEnhance the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Big Game Depredation program to mitigate crop and other damages caused by big game to farm and ranch land.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureIncrease the capacity of the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food to directly participate in the planning of state and local infrastructure needs when agricultural lands are an issue.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAgriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureDevelop incubator kitchens in each county to provide small agricultural companies places to test new products.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureEncourage local governments to recognize the importance of agricultural land uses in their general plans, policies and ordinances.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage local governments to develop specialized local food security plans that work toward these goals.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgriculturePartner with USU Extension, conservation districts, county and city officials, and other interested parties to provide technical assistance for conservation.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage the federal government to eliminate subsidies for agriculture-related products diverted from the food supply for energy production.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureUrge the federal government to allow greater state agricultural environmental stewardship oversight using the traditional educational and voluntary programs of the USDA, conservation districts, and the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food as models.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureCreate federal block grants to fight invasive species on federal and state lands.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgriculturePass a resolution calling on Congress to create a new national agriculture guest worker program.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport federal legislation to provide funding for improved agriculture irrigation infrastructure.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureUpdate the inventory of invasive species in Utah, more clearly define the role of county weed boards in statute, and identify and prioritize weed control measures.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEstablish outreach and education campaigns to inform the public about how to minimize the spread of invasive species.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureAgriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureIncrease the funding and effectiveness of predator control, and allot reasonable and sufficient compensation to agricultural producers for wildlife impacts that may disrupt agricultural production.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport Utah House Bill 116: an ample, sustainable and legal workforce is critical for our farms and ranches.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureOppose using E-verification to verify worker status until federal guest worker laws are in place.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureWork with Utah State University and support groups to develop and implement planning and farm transfer programs that will complement retirement and insurance programs for farmers and ranchers.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport efforts to match farmers without identified successors, with young farmers seeking opportunities to purchase or lease farms or ranches.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage the financial community to finance farm ownership transfer.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureWork with conservation districts in a statewide effort to map Utah irrigation systems, and educate the general public about the irrigation needs of agriculture and the benefits of well-maintained irrigation delivery systems.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
Fire ManagementEcologyIncrease the active use of fire to return fire dependent ecosystems to proper functioning and to reduce hazardous fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Fire ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Fire ManagementEcologyTake timely actions to restore proper functioning of ecosystems after wildfire.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Air QualityStandardsEnsure National Forest management activities result in meeting state and federal air quality standards, and comply with local, state and federal air quality regulations and requirements.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationFully integrate the Heritage Program into land and resource management.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationImplement the National Heritage Strategy emphasizing the need for non-project inventories (Section 110) and public education and awareness programs.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingInventory, evaluate, protect and enhance heritage sites and landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Fire ManagementPreparednessIncrease public understanding and support of the active use of fire to improve watershed and habitat conditions and reduce fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain and/or restore tall forb communities to mid seral or potential natural community (PNC) status.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore as mature and old age classes 40% of total conifer and 30% of total aspen cover types, well distributed across the landscape.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore species composition, such that the species that occupy any given site are predominantly native species in the kind and amount that were historically distributed across the landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Forest ManagementProductsUse timber harvest where allowed, to contribute to the economy while achieving properly functioning conditions of vegetation and watersheds.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Land AccessPlanningAcquire access and rights-of-way for general public and administrative use.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningMinimize the addition of special use encumbered areas of National Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land AccessRight of WayEfforts will be made to obtain right-of-ways for public access to the National Forest. Existing right-of ways will be maintained. A priority for right-of-ways will be the linkages to community trails along the front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-135
Land AccessRight of WayRegional trails, such as the Great Western Trail and the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will be recognized and valued as unique opportunities to develop recreation corridors across multiple ownerships in the face of expanding development across potential trail corridors.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-160
Land AccessRight of WayOgden area in cooperation with the cities of North Ogden, Pleasant View and Willard. Needed access and rights of way will be maintained or acquired to complete the Bonneville Shoreline trail along the Wasatch Front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-146
Land UseStandards/zoningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land UseUtility corridorsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRecognize and manage for the importance of scenic forest landscapes to overall recreation settings as well as to the quality of life for communities adjacent to the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRestore, maintain or enhance landscape scenic integrity across the variety of landscape character themes found on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Law EnforcementIncrease Forest Service field presence in key areas, improve effectiveness of public information on restrictions, and increase participation of individuals and organized groups in monitoring uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Livestock and GrazingManage livestock grazing levels and operations on suitable lands for sustainable forage use within properly functioning conditions.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Noxious WeedsGreatly reduce known infestations of noxious weeds and rigorously prevent their introduction and/or spread.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Noxious WeedsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Recreation and TourismCoordination/partnershipsInvolve Forest users in developing strategies for managing recreation to meet desired future conditions and address recreation pressures and demands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease Forest recreation user stewardship of resources and strengthen awareness of user ethics for reducing resource and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismParks/facilitiesEncourage private enterprise to develop recreational facilities on and off the Forest that provide for a range of recreation opportunities (e.g. camping and picnicking areas, trailheads, and interpretive sites).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage for an array of recreation opportunities and settings to improve the quality of life for a variety of Forest recreation users. Balance growth and expansion of recreation by managing within the capability of sustainable ecosystems found on the Forest for today and the future.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismTourismUse ski area associated private and public developed recreation facilities to provide world-class skiing and mountain resort opportunities while contributing to the economy.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Recreation and TourismTrailsAcquire lands or easements needed to facilitate Bonneville Shoreline and Great Western Trails development.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Recreation and TourismTrailsManage trails to provide desired recreation opportunities for recreation users and to meet Forest Service standards.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage recreation use of undeveloped areas on the forest to provide for desirable opportunities while preventing or reducing resource impacts and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage uses of new recreational technologies to provide for opportunities while preventing or minimizing negative social and/or resource impacts on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Recreation and TourismUser groupsWork closely with city, county, state and tribal governments to provide for integrated, coordinated development and management (including enforcement) of OHV activities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatMaintain pollinators and minimize impacts to pollinators or their habitats.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationIncrease understanding of and support research on the distribution, ecology, and threats to plant species at risk, nonvascular plants and rare plant communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain or restore viability of populations of species at risk, Watch List Plants, and rare communitiesRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viability of species-at-risk (including endangered, threatened and sensitive species and unique communities).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityManage Forest Service sensitive species to prevent them from being classified as threatened or endangered and where possible provide for delisting as sensitive (FSM 2670).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or improve water quality to provide stable and productive riparian and aquatic ecosystems.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore overall watershed health (proper functioning of physical, biological and chemical conditions). Provide for long term soil productivity. Watershed health should be addressed across administrative and political boundaries.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore stream channel integrity, channel processes, and sediment regimes (timing, volume, character of sediment input/transport) under which riparian & aquatic ecosystems developed.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain water in streams, lakes, and wetlands of adequate quantity and quality to provide for instream flows and existing downstream uses including support of healthy riparian & aquatic habitats, stability & effective function of stream channels, ability to route flood discharges, and to maintain recreation opportunities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsProtect waters meeting or surpassing State water quality standards by planning and designing land management activities to protect
water quality.
Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedDesign and implement watershed management programs and plans that will restore water quality and watershed function to support beneficial uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain and/or restore soil productivity to improve watershed functioning through managing ground cover, soil compaction, and vegetation.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedIdentify [watershed] areas not in properly functioning condition. Improve plant species composition, ground cover and age class diversity in these areas.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WildernessManage Wildernesses recognizing differences in population proximity and consequent role in providing wilderness experiences for more people.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
WildlifeThe Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands intends to support the Division of Wildlife Resources in the Wildlife Action Plan strategies.Utah Forest Action Plan41
WildlifeUtah Forest Action Plan73
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Goal: Conserve, improve, and restore mule deer habitat throughout the state with
emphasis on crucial ranges.
Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan18
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Objective 1: Maintain mule deer habitat throughout the state by protecting and enhancing existing crucial habitats and mitigating for losses due to natural and human impacts.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan18
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Objective 2: Improve the quality and quantity of vegetation for mule deer on a minimum of 500,000 acres of crucial range by 2019.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan19
WildlifePopulation managementMaintain a hunting program for mule deer that encourages a variety of quality hunting opportunities while maintaining population objectives.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan20
WildlifePopulation managementPopulation Management Goal: Expand and improve mule deer populations throughout the state within the carrying capacity of available habitats and in consideration of other land uses.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan17
WildlifePopulation managementPopulation Objective: By 2019, increase mule deer populations within the state as conditions allow and bring all populations to their unit objective (currently (2014) 425,400).Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan17
WildlifeHabitatFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
WildlifeHabitatGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
WildlifeHabitatInappropriate Fire Frequency and Intensity - Fire is excluded from habitats in which potential burns now would be frequent, large, and destructive to soils and native vegetation to the habitats are being actively managed (treated) to reduce components or factors that promote risk of catastrophic ?re, such as cheatgrass, excessive conifer encroachment, or unnaturally large stands of mature Gambel oakUtah Wildlife Action Plan188
WildlifeHabitatNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
WildlifeHabitatOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
WildlifeSet population objectives and manage elk populations at appropriate spatial scales that account for migration patterns.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeEstablish local advisory committees to review individual herd unit management plans when considering a change (increase or decrease) in the herd size objective.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeOn units where population decreases are necessary, UDWR will recommend short-term population objectives in unit management plans or increases in antlerless elk permits.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeUtilize antlerless harvest as the primary tool to manage elk populations within herd size objectives and to target specific areas where range concerns or depredation problems exist.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeProperly manage elk populations to minimize competition with mule deer on crucial mule deer range.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeIf drought related conditions and high elk densities are negatively impacting habitat, recommend additional antlerless elk permits at the August Wildlife Board meeting.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeDuring severe winters, aggressively use antlerless elk harvest (public hunters and DWR removal) to minimize conflicts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeConsider using over-the-counter cow elk permits to provide additional harvest and hunting pressure in areas of conflict.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeOn units over objective where cow harvest is difficult to obtain, allow for cow harvest using a general season muzzleloader bull elk permit (similar to general season archery elk hunt).Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEncourage innovative ideas from regional biologists to manage towards population objectives.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeMonitor all elk populations by helicopter survey on a three year rotational basis to evaluate herd size, calf production, herd composition, and habitat use, as conditions and budgets allow.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEvaluate herd size and population trends on an annual basis.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeImplement research studies where needed to close information gaps.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeContinue to support the interagency big game range trend study of crucial ranges throughout the state.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeMonitor range condition, utilization, and trends annually as manpower and budget allow.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
Predator ControlUtilize the Predator Management Policy where needed to help achieve objectives for elk populations, including the management of wolves if necessary.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeInvestigate and manage disease outbreaks that threaten elk populations including CWD and brucellosis.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifePromote management practices that minimize disease risks such as discouraging baiting/feeding, conducting CWD surveillance, and assisting Department of Agricultural in monitoring elk farms/ranches for compliance.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeFollow the emergency big game winter feeding policy, and avoid unnecessary feeding of elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeContinue to provide incentive programs for landowners that will encourage elk populations on private land such as the CWMU, Landowner Association, and Walk-In Access programs.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeAddress all depredation problems in a timely and efficient manner to increase landowner tolerance of elk populations in accordance with current laws, rules, and policies.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIdentify and support the acquisition of property (fee title or conservation easements) from willing sellers that would better accommodate current population numbers or allow for increased elk populations.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIdentify future habitat restoration projects with stakeholders.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIncrease tolerance of public land grazers not enrolled in a CWMU or LOA by conducting habitat projects that will benefit livestock and wildlife.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEducate the public on the use and validity of population modeling in wildlife management.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIncrease communication and understanding between UDWR and stakeholders regarding elk distributions, population estimates, hunt recommendations, and management decisions.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeOn units with high amounts of social conflict, create elk committees during unit plan revisions and/or hold open houses to obtain public input.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeEnforce existing laws that protect resources on public and private lands.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeCreate a private-lands-only permit to encourage and target cow elk harvest on private lands.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIncrease the number of general season cow elk a hunter may annually harvest, but only allow for 1 cow elk permit to be obtained through the public draw system.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeUse depredation permits and vouchers, public hunters, and/or UDWR removal to harvest resident elk on agricultural lands or where elk are creating conflicts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIssue antlerless-elk-control permits on units that are over objective, in areas with limited access, units with low population objectives, or where hunter crowding is an issue.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeCoordinate season dates and permit numbers to distribute elk appropriately within a hunt unit and to achieve adequate harvest in areas of concern.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeInvestigate an incentive program for landowners not enrolled in the CWMU or LOA programs to qualify for a special drawing for bull elk permits/vouchers based on cow harvest. This program should be used on units exceeding their population objective.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeReview and modify eligibility requirements for existing landowner incentive programs (LOA, CWMU, WIA) as needed to increase cow elk harvest and/or improve elk distribution during hunting seasons.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeSecure easements to increase hunter access to elk on public and private lands from willing participants.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeProvide information to educate counties, municipalities, and developers to promote zoning that benefits elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies and private landowners to properly manage and improve elk habitat, especially calving and wintering areas.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWork with state and federal land management agencies to use livestock as a management tool to enhance crucial elk ranges.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWatershed restoration initiative: Increase forage production by annually treating a minimum of 40,000 acres of elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies, conservation organizations, private landowners, and local leaders through the regional Watershed Restoration Initiative working groups to identify and prioritize elk habitats that are in need of enhancement or restoration.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeAcquire additional, important elk habitat from willing sellers to offset habitat loss.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSupport programs, such as conservation easements, that provide incentives to private landowners to keep prime elk habitat managed as rangeland.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeEducate the public on the value of the general license, conservation, and expo permits for funding elk habitat improvement projects.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeContinue to support the conservation permit and habitat enhancement programs that provide crucial funding for habitat improvement efforts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSeek to maintain less than 2 miles of roads per square mile within crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWork cooperatively with UDOT, county, state, and federal agencies to limit the impacts of roads on elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSupport the establishment of multi-agency OHV plans developed on a county or planning unit level to prevent resource damage and protect crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies and energy development proponents to develop an effective mitigation approach for oil, gas, and mining proposals and large scale developments (e.g., solar, wind, and recreation) which have the potential to impact crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeEncourage energy development companies to avoid and minimize the impact of disturbance and use Best Management Practices that promote the conservation of wildlife resources.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
Noxious WeedsWork with land management agencies and county weed boards to control the spread of noxious and invasive weeds throughout the range of elk in Utah.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeEstimate current population size and evaluate population trends; estimate amount and condition of habitat.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify research needs and knowledge gaps.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeDetermine population and habitat needs for the future.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify and discuss threats that have potential to impact sage-grouse in Morgan and Summit Counties, especially those associated with the five USFWS Listing Factors.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIncorporate management strategies from state and federal agency partners, local governments, and established rangewide conservation and management.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIncrease effective communication with all potential stakeholders in Morgan and Summit Counties and the state of Utah, through outreach, information distribution, and education.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeAddress and prioritize threats to aid in prioritizing management solutions.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify and pursue funding sources, or support partners in their pursuance of funding for projects that will help achieve specific strategies and actions.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3