Wasatch County


Resource Planning Priorities

Based on a public opinion survey, the County identified these as the “top 5” resource planning topics for data gathering purposes:

  1. Water Quality and Hydrology
  2. Air Quality
  3. Recreation and Tourism
  4. Land Use
  5. Land Access

However, when survey respondents rated 19 categories of resource topics on a 1-10 rating scale, the majority of the topics were rated above the scale midpoint, suggesting that survey respondents support a multiple use approach to county resource management planning. More details of the survey are summarized below.

Wasatch County’s Natural Resources

The Natural Resources Conservation Service provides the following useful overview of the County’s natural resources:

Existing Resource Planning

Existing federal, state, and county planning documents for Wasatch County were reviewed to identify existing goals and polices related to the CRMP planning topics. The planning matrix below categorizes the existing goals and policies from these plans by resource topic and can be used as resource in CRMP planning.

MAG Public Survey - Wasatch County

MAG Public Survey – Wasatch County

The three MAG counties solicited public comment through an on-line survey, implemented between June 29 and September 9, 2016. The public was notified of the availability of the survey through press releases, public service announcements, public meetings, public events, and other means. There were a total of 53 responses from Wasatch County residents.

Public Land Resource Values

The first survey question asked respondents to rank seven public land resource values from highest to lowest. On average, Wasatch County respondents ranked “protecting water quality” as the highest of the seven. “Maximizing natural resource development” ranked lowest.

 

Resource Management Planning Priorities

The next question asked respondents about county resource management planning priorities. Respondents rated 19 topics on a 1-10 scale. The majority of the topics were rated above the scale midpoint, suggesting that survey respondents support a multiple use approach to county resource management planning. Consistent with the first survey question, water quality was the highest rated topic. Predator control and mining, energy, and minerals were the only two topics that respondents rated below the scale midpoint. This may possibly indicate that respondents do not perceive these to be major public land issues in Wasatch County, or that these resources are perceived to be less of a responsibility for the County.

Average Rating on 1-10 Scale (1 = Very Low Priority, 10 = Very High Priority)
Resource Planning TopicSummit CountyUtah CountyWasatch County
Water quality and hydrology9.18.68.5
Air quality8.87.98.4
Forestry and fire management8.37.87.4
Land use7.87.97.5
Wild and scenic rivers8.47.68.1
Wildlife and fisheries8.27.67.6
Wilderness8.47.58.3
Land access7.17.87.5
Recreation and tourism7.47.57.7
Water rights, irrigation, ditches and canals7.57.57.3
Cultural, historical, geological, and paleontological resources7.67.17.4
Threatened, endangered, and sensitive species8.16.97.4
Wetlands and riparian areas8.26.67.3
Floodplains and river terraces7.46.76.8
Law enforcement on public lands6.96.76.6
Noxious weeds7.36.26.5
Agriculture, livestock, and grazing6.26.35.5
Predator control4.65.74.8
Mining, energy, and minerals including distribution3.85.14.0

Top 5 Resource Priorities

In the next survey question, respondents were asked to pick their “top 5” resource priorities from the 19 topics in the previous question. Water quality was the most frequently identified, followed by air quality, recreation and tourism, land access, and land use. Percentages of Wasatch County respondents selecting each of the 19 topics as one of their “top 5” planning priorities are presented in the graphic below.

Top 5 Resource Planning Topics
Summit CountyPercent
Selecting
 Utah CountyPercent
Selecting
 Wasatch CountyPercent Selecting
Water Quality and Hydrology66.9%Water Quality and Hydrology66.9%Water Quality and Hydrology67.9%
Wilderness48.1%Air Quality42.0%Air Quality47.2%
Air Quality45.9%Land Access42.0%Recreation and Tourism47.2%
Recreation and Tourism36.8%Recreation and Tourism40.6%Land Use47.2%
Wildlife, Fisheries34.6%Land Use39.8%Land Access45.3%

 

Survey Respondents

Of the 53 Wasatch County respondents, average length of residence in the county was 20 years, 68% were male, and 32% were female. Age of respondents is summarized in the graphic below.
MAG Plan Review Matrix - Wasatch County

MAG Plan Review Matrix – Wasatch County

Resource CategorySubcategoryGoals and PoliciesPlanPage
AgricultureAttempt to assimilate new development with working agricultural uses.Wasatch County General Plan66
AgricultureProtect the rural agricultural economy of the county by establishing agricultural operations as a priority use of the land, protect existing and future agricultural operations, and encourage farmers and ranchers to stay on the land.Wasatch County General Plan77
Air QualityStandardsEnsure National Forest management activities result in meeting state and federal air quality standards, and comply with local, state and federal air quality regulations and requirements.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Air QualityManagement activities do not cause exceedances of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) (this monitoring is required by law).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan2-Feb
Air QualityActivities on the Forest do not impede attainment of state clean air standards.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan2-Feb
Air QualityAllow development in the Heber Valley area without compromising the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.Wasatch County General Plan67
Air QualityDetermining the number of residential units that could be permitted in the Heber Valley air shed without violating the National Ambient Air Quality Standards is beyond the scope and resources of this planning effort. Therefore, the number of residential units on an interim bases (until an Air Quality Study can be completed) shall be established at the level that would have been permitted by current Land Use and Health Department Regulations.Wasatch County General Plan67
Air QualityDiscourage extensive use of wood burning stoves as a means in preserve present air quality.Wasatch County General Plan67
Air QualityWasatch County air quality will be protected by standards described in the Utah State Implementation Plan approved by the EPA, whose authority is the Clean Air Act of 1990.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityHigh-level air quality is necessary to prevent restrictions on future economic development.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityBaseline air quality data must be established for Wasatch County with full participation of the County. Decisions must be based on this data.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityAir in Wasatch County must be protected from degradation by outside sources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityProtect or enhance air quality.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationFully integrate the Heritage Program into land and resource management.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationImplement the National Heritage Strategy emphasizing the need for non-project inventories (Section 110) and public education and awareness programs.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingInventory, evaluate, protect and enhance heritage sites and landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPlants and use areas associated with traditional uses (e.g., sustenance, medicine, and ceremony) that are culturally significant to Native American communities are identified and maintained or protected.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan18-Feb
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProvide the public with the opportunity to learn about the natural,
cultural and historical resources of the area and the need for courtesy
and safety.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect the cultural and paleontological resources of the area.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesIdentify the present integrity and eligibility of cultural resources,
including historic, prehistoric, and paleontological resources, where
development is proposed.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesRecommend mechanisms to protect, preserve, restore, recognize, and
interpret historic, prehistoric, and paleontological resource sites.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicalUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan4-Feb
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicalAllow no development on slopes greater than thirty (30) percent.Wasatch County General Plan66
Ditches and CanalsPotential reservoir sites and delivery system corridors shall be identified in land use plans and protected from federal or state action that would prohibit or restrict future use for those purposes. Said plans would include provisions for adding or deleting potential reservoir sites and delivery system corridors when deemed appropriate.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Ditches and CanalsAgency actions shall recognize all legal canal, lateral, and ditch easements and rights-of-way.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Economic ConsiderationsEmphasis is placed on minimizing natural resource and water quality degradations resulting from maintenance activities. Safety and the preservation of capital investments are emphasized.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Economic ConsiderationsCritical infrastructure, such as roads and administrative and recreation sites, are protected.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Economic ConsiderationsSafe, adequate, and economical facilities support public and administrative uses of National Forest System lands.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Energy ResourcesAllow exploration and subsequent development of oil and gas to meet the
national demand for these resources, consistent with national energy policies
and related demands.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)13
Energy ResourcesMake geothermal steam available for use on a managed and controlled
basis consistent with national energy policies and related demands.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)17
Energy ResourcesOpportunities to develop projects that demonstrate state of the art environmental protection techniques and landscape-compatible design of oil and gas production facilities are utilized.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan17-Feb
Energy ResourcesEncourage exploration of energy and minerals on public land to ensure that our future energy needs and resource management opportunities are considered. Agencies shall plan, fund, and encourage by policy and management decisions relative to energy resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Energy ResourcesAfter environmental analysis, and as provided for in the governing resource management plan, all tracts will be available and offered for lease or opened to be claimed as provided by law. Wasatch County recognizes that, while all Federal administered land within the county is currently available for lease, decisions are made regarding oil and gas leases through the land use planning process. Alternatives identify areas where leasing may occur with standard lease terms, timing and controlled surface use stipulations or no surface occupancy. Additionally, some areas may be considered for no leasing in the future.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Energy ResourcesAll permits and applications must be processed on a timely basis, in accordance with Onshore Oil and Gas Order Number 1. Procedures and required contents of application must be provided by the applicant at the time of application.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Fire ManagementEcologyIncrease the active use of fire to return fire dependent ecosystems to proper functioning and to reduce hazardous fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Fire ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Fire ManagementEcologyTake timely actions to restore proper functioning of ecosystems after wildfire.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementPreparednessIncrease public understanding and support of the active use of fire to improve watershed and habitat conditions and reduce fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyFire is returned to habitats from which it had been unnaturally excluded, the ?re regime (frequency and intensity) in these habitats generally approximates a natural, pre-settlement regime.Utah Wildlife Action Plan190
Fire ManagementEcologyInappropriate Fire Frequency and Intensity - Fire is excluded from habitats in which potential burns now would be frequent, large, and destructive to soils and native vegetation to the habitats are being actively managed (treated) to reduce components or factors that promote risk of catastrophic ?re, such as cheatgrass, excessive conifer encroachment, or unnaturally large stands of mature Gambel oakUtah Wildlife Action Plan188
Fire ManagementThe fuel management aspect of the fire management program is emphasized through application of hazard reduction activities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Fire ManagementFire is managed in an economically efficient manner, based on resource values and risks to human life and property.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Fire ManagementFire is reintroduced as an ecosystem function to move landscapes toward desired conditions.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Fire ManagementPriorities to protect property and natural/cultural resources are determined based on relative values to be protected, fire management costs, and risks to human (including firefighter) safety.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Fire ManagementSound fuel load management techniques shall be used to minimize fire potential at the urban interface and prevent catastrophic events.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Fire ManagementThe different landscapes found within the county have become dependent upon fire to maintain the health and vigor of the many ecosystems. With the advent of fire suppression, many ecosystems have departed from pre-suppression conditions. As a result, when fires occur they are often more damaging and cause greater adverse impacts to soil, wildlife habitat, recreational resources, and watersheds.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment11
FisheriesInvasive Speciesimprove the ability of natural resource management entities within Utah to prevent invasion of AIS into the state, and to contain AIS through accepted management practices to areas that are either already infested or become infested.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan18
FisheriesInvasive SpeciesUtah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan19
FisheriesInvasive SpeciesThe Utah AIS Management Plan will facilitate increased interdictions of boats and equipment contaminated with AIS, requiring decontamination under authority of the Utah Aquatic Invasive Species
Interdiction Act and Rule R657-60 Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction in order to control the spread of AIS
Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan21
FisheriesInvasive Speciesfacilitate opportunity to apply contemporary natural resource management practices in order to regulate, control and eradicate AIS, allowing rehabilitation of infested areas followed by documented monitoring of success in all phases of management.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan22
FisheriesBarriersUtah Wildlife Action Plan203
FisheriesBarriersNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
FisheriesBarriersNative ?shes are able to move past water?diversion barriers where necessary or desired.Utah Wildlife Action Plan203
FisheriesFlowsEstablish water allocation policies protecting su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem for aquatic key habitats (especially those with occurrences of SGCNs).Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
FisheriesFlowsNatural hydrographs (timing, duration, temperature, etc) are restored or mimicked in priority stream reaches below dams and reservoirs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan205
FisheriesHabitatAquatic key habitats (especially at those locations important for SGCNs) contain su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem that supports the conservation target(s).Utah Wildlife Action Plan196
FisheriesHabitatComplex habitats and ?oodplain connections are restored or maintained in selected rivers/streams.Utah Wildlife Action Plan199
FisheriesUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan7-Feb
FisheriesProtect and maintain 10 conservation populations, 12 persistence populations, and one metapopulation (consisting of six waterbodies in the Diamond Fork drainage) of Bonneville cutthroat trout within the Utah Lake/Provo River drainage of the Northern Bonneville Geographic Management Unit (GMU)Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan7-Feb
FisheriesProvide and maintain habitat to support native fish populations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
FisheriesLand management agencies shall make every effort to provide additional opportunities for fishing on public lands in Wasatch County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
FisheriesProtect or enhance the quality of the fisheries and fish habitat within the
framework of existing laws and management authority.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
FisheriesCoordinate annual reservoir operations with the UDWR to identify
possible fishery enhancement opportunities.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
FisheriesRecommend appropriate development criteria for improving fish
habitat.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
FisheriesCoordinate with appropriate agencies (e.g., UDWR, State Parks) to
prevent invasive aquatic species.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
FisheriesRequire mandatory boat inspection for aquatic invasive species and
provide boat decontamination station and trained technician.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
FloodplainsSufficient vegetation is left on channel banks to catch sediments necessary for streambank maintenance and floodplain development.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan2-Feb
FloodplainsWhere practical, streams have access to their floodplains during spring runoff, on average, two out of every three years. Stream channel width to depth ratios, entrenchment ratios, and sinuosity are within expected norms for the appropriate channel type.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan3-Feb
FloodplainsProhibit structures within 100 feet of an active stream or in a designated FEMA flood way unless the foundation is constructed at least one foot above the 100 year flood level.Wasatch County General Plan66
FloodplainsConsultation with PRWUA could provide helpful information as they
have developed and are implementing an upper Provo River
maintenance program to help mitigate flood impacts above the
Jordanelle Reservoir.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
Forest ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain and/or restore tall forb communities to mid seral or potential natural community (PNC) status.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore as mature and old age classes 40% of total conifer and 30% of total aspen cover types, well distributed across the landscape.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore species composition, such that the species that occupy any given site are predominantly native species in the kind and amount that were historically distributed across the landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Forest ManagementProductsUse timber harvest where allowed, to contribute to the economy while achieving properly functioning conditions of vegetation and watersheds.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Forest ManagementUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Forest ManagementEcosystem resilience is maintained by providing for a full range of seral stages and age classes (by cover type) that achieve a mosaic of habitat conditions and diversity to meet a variety of desired resource management objectives. Recruitment and sustainability of some early seral species and vegetation communities in the landscape are necessary to maintain ecosystem resilience to perturbations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Forest ManagementMaintain adequate distribution of old growth in forested community types. Maintain at least 10 percent of each forest vegetation type in an old growth condition as defined in the Forest Service publication, Characteristics of Old Growth Forests in the Intermountain Region (USDA 1993), or subsequently modified Regional Forester-approved definition. Ensure the presence through time by providing for suitable and potential replacement areas.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Forest ManagementManagement actions maintain ecosystem health and encourage conditions that are within the historic range of variation. Management actions remain within the variability of size, intensity, and frequency of native disturbance regimes characteristic of the subject landscape and ecological processes.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Forest ManagementKey shrubs and/or trees are maintained to a level that allows adequate recruitment to maintain or recover the woody component. Specifically, the Forest is managed for more plants in the combined sprout and young categories than in the combined mature and dead categories.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Forest ManagementIntegrated pest management systems and strategies that provide protection of forest resources with the least hazard to humans and the environment are developed, practiced, and encouraged.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Forest ManagementReclamation activities are designed to provide for achieving desired future conditions for the management area(s) involved.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan12-Feb
Forest ManagementReclamation activities:
a. Stabilize the area,
b. Protect the aesthetics of the area,
c. Prevent water from off-site sources from impacting the disturbed area,
d. Control surface runoff to minimize erosion,
e. Trap sediment to enhance establishment of vegetation,
f. Restore and stabilize all unnecessary roads,
g. Include revegetation seeding or planting of local native species, and, where needed, fertilization and replacement of topsoil on all disturbed areas,
h. Provide maintenance of repeat applications where initial treatments do not achieve objectives, and
i. Prevent subsequent pollution from the site.
Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan12-Feb
Forest ManagementSilvicultural treatments are utilized to manage forested vegetation to provide for an ecologically sustainable (i.e., within a range of natural variability) mix of wildlife habitats, old growth and other late successional stages, recreational opportunities, and wood products for both commercial and personal use (e.g., personal use permits for the gathering of fuelwood, Christmas trees, tree seedling transplants, and miscellaneous other products).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan16-Feb
Forest ManagementAn annual and sustainable program of commercial timber sales is offered. The Forest contributes to the sustaining of local lifestyles and economies.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan16-Feb
Forest ManagementThe Jumpoff Research Natural Area (RNA) maintains the subalpine fir, climax aspen, mountain brush, and sagebrush steppe ecosystems for which it was designated.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan24-Feb
Forest ManagementThe Diamond Fork Youth Forest provides an area for youth to investigate, study, interact with natural resource managers, and engage in management of our natural resources.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan24-Feb
Forest ManagementAll forestlands shall be managed for multiple use and sustained yield. Ensure realistic targets are established and outputs are sustainable over the long-term.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementOpportunities for harvesting forest products shall be promoted.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementManagement strategies shall protect timber and adverse impacts to other resources from the devastating effects of fire (in accordance with the National Fire Plan and the National Healthy Forest Initiative), insects, disease, wind throw, blow down, ice storms, or imminent risk of such epidemics because of conditions on adjacent land.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementHarvesting techniques shall be employed that will prevent waste of forest products.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementForest management techniques shall be implemented that will maintain or enhance watershed health and long-term water quantity, yield and quality.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementManagement programs must provide opportunities for citizens to harvest forest products for personal needs, economic value and forest health.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessPlanningAcquire access and rights-of-way for general public and administrative use.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningMinimize the addition of special use encumbered areas of National Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land AccessRight of WayEfforts will be made to obtain right-of-ways for public access to the National Forest. Existing right-of ways will be maintained. A priority for right-of-ways will be the linkages to community trails along the front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-135
Land AccessRight of WayRegional trails, such as the Great Western Trail and the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will be recognized and valued as unique opportunities to develop recreation corridors across multiple ownerships in the face of expanding development across potential trail corridors.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-160
Land AccessRight of WayOgden area in cooperation with the cities of North Ogden, Pleasant View and Willard. Needed access and rights of way will be maintained or acquired to complete the Bonneville Shoreline trail along the Wasatch Front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-146
Land AccessThe inclusion of forest access in city and county land use planning is encouraged.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan20-Feb
Land AccessAppropriate access on established travel routes to the Forest boundary is assured through coordination with local jurisdictions. These travel routes include, but are not limited to, Rock Canyon, Slate Canyon, Battle Creek, Grove Creek, Nebo Creek, Bennie Creek, and White River (Left and Right Forks).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan21-Feb
Land AccessA safe, effective, and economical transportation system is planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide appropriate access associated with movement of people and materials to and through the Forest, and to support movement of materials associated with management, use, and administration of the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan21-Feb
Land AccessThe existing transportation systems are managed and maintained in an environmentally sensitive manner. The Forest will continue to look for opportunities to realign transportation systems to reduce impacts on the environment, particularly out of riparian areas to upland areas.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan21-Feb
Land AccessRoads and trails are managed to protect or minimize impacts on resources.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Land AccessNon-beneficial and/or unauthorized roads and trails are decommissioned, obliterated, or rehabilitated if they do not meet resource objectives or provide necessary access to facilities or inholdings.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Land AccessA minimum number of Forest Service roads and trails are developed, maintained, and managed to respond to resource management objectives. Many road-related activities occur in support of timber management, dispersed and developed recreation uses, range, administration, and resource protection (including fire).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Land AccessAn inventory of classified roads is maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Land AccessAn analysis and determination of the management objectives for unclassified roads is completed concurrent with landscape assessments or site-specific project development and analysis.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan22-Feb
Land AccessAccess to and across public lands, including RS 2477 Roads and rights-of-way should remain open and maintained to allow safe and reliable public access.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAll necessary action will be taken to protect access. The county will identify and inventory roads and participate with federal and state land management agencies in decision-making regarding site-specific management.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAccess and transportation needs shall be considered, evaluated and analyzed in the land use planning process in order to accommodate and be consistent with other uses. No roads, trails, rights-of-way, easements or other traditional access for the transportation of people, products, recreation, energy or livestock may be closed, abandoned, withdrawn, or have a change of use without full public disclosure and analysis.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessFuture access needs must be planned and analyzed to determine the disposition of the road at the completion of its intended life. This is to ensure that needed access is maintained or that such access is removed and resulting disturbances reclaimed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAccess to all water related facilities such as dams, reservoirs, delivery systems, monitoring facilities, communication sites, etc., must be maintained. This access must be economically feasible with respect to the method and timing of such access.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessIt is expected that the Federal and State Agencies will conform to the transportation provisions of the Resource Management Plan to be consistent with the [Wasatch County] General Plan maps, as required by FLPMA Section 1712(c)(9). It is also expected that when such mapping is completed for areas under the stewardship of the United States Forest Service, the Forest Service will conform the transportation provisions of its forest plans to be consistent with such maps.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessTitle V rights-of-way on public lands are granted in perpetuity and do not diminish any RS 2477 claim or right-of-way.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAccess to and through public lands is essential to healthy recreation and tourism within the County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessProvide Appropriate and Safe Access to Public Use AreasJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Land AccessAccess must continue to be restricted in the Primary Jurisdiction Zone
or other areas that could compromise public or facility safety.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan8-Apr
Land AccessRestrict access that would compromise water quality or any of the
other purposes of the reservoir.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan8-Apr
Land UseStandards/zoningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land UseUtility corridorsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRecognize and manage for the importance of scenic forest landscapes to overall recreation settings as well as to the quality of life for communities adjacent to the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRestore, maintain or enhance landscape scenic integrity across the variety of landscape character themes found on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land UseJurisdiction/exchangesupgrade school and institutional trust land assets where prudent by exchange.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitymanage school and institutional trust lands for their highest and best trust land use.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitymaximize the commercial gain from trust land uses for school and institutional trust lands consistent with long-term support of beneficiariesSITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitypermit other land uses or activities not prohibited by law which do not constitute a loss of trust assets or loss of economic opportunity.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseOpen spaceOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
Land UseStandards/zoningFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
Land UseDetermine whether retention or disposal will be in the best public
interest.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)8
Land UseUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan17-Feb
Land UseScenic quality and desired landscape character are maintained and/or enhanced.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan18-Feb
Land UseWithin the economic and social constraints of local communities, critical habitat for federally-listed threatened and endangered species and big game winter range under other ownership within and adjacent to the Forest boundary is acquired.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan21-Feb
Land UseVisualPromote preservation of ridge lines from development as viewed from any State Roads or County arterial or collector road by keeping the roof lines of structures below the ridge line. A transferable density credit of an additional unit shall be allowed for each unit removed from a ridge line.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UseDiscourage development of sensitive land such as wetlands, landslides, and stream corridors.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UsePromote clustering of developments in mountain environments in a manner that will preserve scenic values, preserve and protect flora and wildlife of the surrounding area, minimize soil erosion, reduce the cost of infrastructure and public services and reduce the impact of wildland fires.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UsePreserve the rural atmosphere by requiring all development to have dark sky compliant lighting.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UseInstall structural measures to prevent soil erosion, as needed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseRecognize the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) soil survey as the authority in matters of soil conservation.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseBase soil conservation activities on all available survey drafts until a final survey is published. Any deviation from this material or soil data developed outside of the survey must be coordinated with the Wasatch County Soil Conservation District and Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS).Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UsePrime agricultural lands should continue to produce food and fiber and the rural character and open landscape of Wasatch County should be preserved through a healthy agricultural industry consistent with private property rights.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseThe County shall be compensated for loss of private lands or tax revenues due to land exchanges.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UsePrivate lands shall not be converted to state or federal ownership in order to compensate for government activities outside of Wasatch County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseAny conversion from private property to public lands shall result in no net loss of private property. No net loss shall be measured both in terms of acreage and fair market value. All proposed conversions will be reviewed by the Wasatch County Public Lands Committee to evaluate the impact of the proposal and advise the County Council of their recommendation.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseA private property owner has a right to dispose of or exchange property as he/she sees fit within applicable law.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land Usea. The objectives of special designations can be met by well-planned and managed development and use of natural resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land Useb. Special designations shall not be proposed until the need has been determined and substantiated by verifiable scientific data available to the public. Furthermore, it must be demonstrated that protection cannot be provided by any other means and that the area in question is truly unique or essential compared to other area lands. Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UsePursue environmental management activities with other private, state
and federal agencies to avoid habitat degradation or loss.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Land UseVisual ResourcesProtect or enhance the visual resource of the area.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Land UseControl erosion where practicable.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Land UseIdentify areas and management not suitable for development.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Land UseIdentify appropriate and compatible land uses that optimize the benefits
to the public within the reservoirs' operating criteria.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Land UseIdentify areas and management suitable for project purposes, wildlife
and natural areas, grazing, recreation, access, roads, trails, utilities and
other land uses and activities.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Land UseClose, rehabilitate or discontinue specific uses or facilities where not
appropriate.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Land UseVisualProtect and Manage the Visual ResourcesJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan5-Apr
Land UseWork with water users, Recreation Park Manager, and other entities as
appropriate to implement erosion control strategies.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Law EnforcementIncrease Forest Service field presence in key areas, improve effectiveness of public information on restrictions, and increase participation of individuals and organized groups in monitoring uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Law EnforcementWork with law enforcement to understand the responsibilities between
State Parks and Wasatch County.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Law EnforcementWork cooperatively with other local agencies to maximize the use of
existing resources and funding to ensure adequate levels of
enforcement are provided in order to balance public safety, resource
protection, and water supply commitments.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Livestock and GrazingManage livestock grazing levels and operations on suitable lands for sustainable forage use within properly functioning conditions.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Livestock and GrazingGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
Livestock and GrazingMaintain and/or improve livestock forage on NRL and place under custodial
management all tracts of NRL 40 acres or more in size.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)18
Livestock and GrazingNon-native rangelands are restored to native rangeland ecosystemsas opportunities arise.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Livestock and GrazingLivestock are managed to achieve or maintain desired vegetative composition for greater sage grouse nesting and brood-rearing habitatsin the Vernon and Strawberry Reservoir Management Areas.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Livestock and GrazingIf consistent with ecosystem health and integrity, and threatened, endangered, and sensitive species management, forage for livestock grazing on lands identified as suited for this use is provided to support social and economic community stability.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan16-Feb
Livestock and GrazingLivestock grazing occurs at a season and/or level of use that allows appropriate ground cover, species composition, and age classes for the grazing unit being administered and monitored.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan16-Feb
Livestock and GrazingPublic land management agencies shall maintain livestock grazing permits and grazing allocations as established in their resource management plan until further analysis of rangeland improvements and conditions justifies increased or decreased grazing capacities.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingThe County recognizes grazing permits on public lands as an asset, which may be waived and transferred by the agency. Such transactions must be processed by the land management agency within ninety days of proper notification. Any reduction in the capacity of the permit or forage allocation as a result of the transaction shall not be made without a specific scientific justification and analysis.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingWhen grazing permits are withdrawn from a livestock operator due to grazing violations, the permit shall not be reallocated to other uses and shall be made available for continued livestock use before the commencement of the next grazing season.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingAccess to public rangeland is vital to the permit-holders and the management agency for planning, management, and development. Access shall be maintained and improved as management needs require.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
LIvestock and GrazingManagement decisions shall be based on the individual range allotment condition and not on the overall condition of surrounding lands. Increases in available forage resulting from the conservation practices of livestock permit-holders (temporary non-use) shall not be allocated or credited to other uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
LIvestock and GrazingForage allocation reductions resulting from forage studies, drought, or natural disasters shall be implemented on an allotment basis. Reductions shall be applied proportionately to all allocations unless it can be proven that a specific type of grazing animal is causing the land health degradation. Wasatch County recognizes that, in the event of fire, drought or natural disaster, a variety of emergency or interim actions may be necessary to minimize land health degradation, such as temporary reduced forage allocation for livestock and wildlife. Forage allocation reductions shall be temporary. Grazing allocations shall be restored when forage production is restoredWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
LIvestock and GrazingNoxious weed and invasive plant control efforts that affect forage allocations shall be discussed by the land management agency with livestock representatives, neighboring landowners, and the County weed specialist. After the discussion, a weed control plan shall be developed and implemented. Control of noxious weed species shall be conducted in accordance to the Wasatch County Noxious Weed Plan.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
LIvestock and GrazingPublic land management agencies shall endeavor to inspect riparian and sensitive areas with livestock permittees. If riparian areas are damaged or degraded before the livestock enter the grazing allotment, the management agency and representatives shall make a record of the condition and appropriate mitigation shall be acceptable to all parties. A copy of the signed report shall be filed with the agency and provided to the permit-holder, Wasatch County and the appropriate state agency responsible for the management of the offending wildlife species.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingIncreases in available forage resulting from practices or improvements implemented by managing agency will be allocated proportionately to all forage allocations, unless the funding source specifies the benefactor.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingChanges in season of use or forage allocation must not be made without full and meaningful consultation with permittee. The permittee must be the first point of contact.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingThe continued viability of livestock operations and the livestock industry shall be supported on federal and state lands within Wasatch County by management of the lands and forage resources and the optimization of animal unit months for livestock in accordance with the multiple-use provisions of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq., the provisions of the Taylor Grazing Act of 1934, 43 U.S.C. 315 et seq., and the provisions of the Public Rangelands Improvement Act of 1978, 43 U.S.C. 1901 et seq.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesMake available and encourage development of lead, zinc, silver, gold and
cadmium to meet the national demand and boost the local economy.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)16
Mineral ResourcesIf consistent with ecosystem health and integrity, the demand for mineral and energy resources through environmentally responsible exploration, development, and production on National Forest System lands is satisfied through contributions by the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan17-Feb
Mineral ResourcesAccess to public lands for mineral development must be maintained and increased in an environmentally sound basis to enhance the economic interest of county citizens and government.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesMineral exploration and development are consistent with the multiple use philosophy for management of public lands. These activities constitute a temporary use of the land that will not impair its use for other purposes over the long term. All oil and mineral exploration activities shall comply with appropriate laws and regulations and shall be conducted in an environmentally sound process, including heli-drilling where appropriate.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesAll management plans must address and analyze the possibility for the development of minerals where there is a reasonable expectation of their occurrence.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesDevelopment of the solid, fluid, and gaseous mineral resources of the state should be encouraged. The waste of fluid and gaseous minerals within developed areas should be prohibited. Requirements to mitigate or reclaim mineral development projects should be based on credible evidence of significant impacts to natural or cultural resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious WeedsGreatly reduce known infestations of noxious weeds and rigorously prevent their introduction and/or spread.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Noxious WeedsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Noxious weedsAppropriately manage existing and invasive weeds in Utah through: A) education and research; B) Mapping and monitoring; C) Prevention, early detection, and rapid response; D) Control - integrated weed management; E) Restoration; F) Regulation and enforcement; G) Funding.Utah Strategic Plan for Managing Noxious and Invasive Weeds18
Noxious WeedsInvasive plant dominance/presence is reduced or eliminated in locations or habitats where such an outcome is realistic (ecologically and economically).Utah Wildlife Action Plan228
Noxious WeedsUtah Wildlife Action Plan226
Noxious weedsEstablished noxious weed infestations are not increasing or are reduced to low densities. New invader species are not becoming established. New infestations of species are contained or reduced. New populations of existing noxious weeds are eradicated or reduced in highly susceptible, often disturbed areas. Native plants dominate most landscapes that have been rehabilitated.Wasatch-Cache National Forest Noxious Weed Treatment Program:DEIS1/15/2016
Noxious weedsActivities and vegetation management minimize or eliminate the occurrence of non-native pests (including noxious weeds) and epidemic episodes of native pests.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan7-Feb
Noxious weedsEmphasis will be placed on cooperating with seed suppliers to grow State-certified, local, source-identified seed. To the extent possible, this seed should be of species the Forest uses or desires to use in revegetation. Preference will be given to using field-produced, source-identified seed over wild-collected seed.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan7-Feb
Noxious weedsNoxious weeds will be controlled to prevent the loss of soil resource.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious weedsWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious weedsThe Wasatch County Noxious Weed Management Plan shall be implemented for preventing, containing, or controlling undesirable plant species or groups of species using all available strategies and techniques prescribed by the State Noxious Weed Act.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious weedsImplement integrated pest management strategies.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Mar
Noxious weedsIdentify locations and extent of where state-listed noxious weeds,
invasive exotics, and other plants are a problem requiring action.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan5-Apr
Noxious weedsFollow the Integrated Pest Management Plan.Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan5-Apr
Noxious weedsWeeds are a problem for everyone. Federal, state, and local agencies and private landowners are responsible for the noxious weeds present on their lands. Prevention, early detection, control, and eradication of noxious weeds are the most practical means of weed management.Summit County Resource Assessment, Wasatch County Resource Assessment5
Noxious WeedsThe Goal of the Wasatch County Weed Board is to further our efforts through the county coordinator and weed area CWMA programs to work with the several agencies within the county for the purpose of control and containment of the spread of noxious weeds. Our goal also is to guide and assist the private land owners to control weeds on their lands.Wasatch County Public Works Department. 2009. Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County7
Predator ControlMaintain a healthy cougar population within their current distribution while considering human safety, economic concerns, other wildlife species, and maintaining hunting traditions through 2025.Utah Cougar Management Plan3
Predator ControlThe DWR predator-control program provides incentives for hunters to remove coyotes. Primary goal of the program is to remove coyotes from areas where they may prey on mule deer. Participants receive $50 for each properly documented coyote that they kill in Utah.Utah Predator Control Program Summary 2014-20150
Predator ControlDepleted native species whose populations require relief from native predators, receive assistance for as long as they need it, and no longer.Utah Wildlife Action Plan240
Predator ControlUtah Wildlife Action Plan240
Predator ControlCooperate with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services in managing predators. Predator control activities will only be conducted when necessary to prevent significant property loss, significant risk to public safety, or significant impacts on the viability of native wildlife populations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan9-Feb
Predator ControlPredator numbers must be managed and controlled to protect livestock and private property values.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Predator ControlPredator and wildlife numbers must be controlled to protect livestock and other private property and to prevent population decline in other wildlife species.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Predator ControlPredator control is vital to the establishment of sage-grouse and other threatened and endangered species. It is observed that the increase in predators, through their protection, has resulted in the decrease of the sensitive species that wildlife agencies are trying to protect. Proper management practices can be used to control predators and protect sensitive species.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment9
Recreation and TourismCoordination/partnershipsInvolve Forest users in developing strategies for managing recreation to meet desired future conditions and address recreation pressures and demands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease Forest recreation user stewardship of resources and strengthen awareness of user ethics for reducing resource and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismParks/facilitiesEncourage private enterprise to develop recreational facilities on and off the Forest that provide for a range of recreation opportunities (e.g. camping and picnicking areas, trailheads, and interpretive sites).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage for an array of recreation opportunities and settings to improve the quality of life for a variety of Forest recreation users. Balance growth and expansion of recreation by managing within the capability of sustainable ecosystems found on the Forest for today and the future.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismTourismUse ski area associated private and public developed recreation facilities to provide world-class skiing and mountain resort opportunities while contributing to the economy.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Recreation and TourismTrailsAcquire lands or easements needed to facilitate Bonneville Shoreline and Great Western Trails development.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Recreation and TourismTrailsManage trails to provide desired recreation opportunities for recreation users and to meet Forest Service standards.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage recreation use of undeveloped areas on the forest to provide for desirable opportunities while preventing or reducing resource impacts and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage uses of new recreational technologies to provide for opportunities while preventing or minimizing negative social and/or resource impacts on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Recreation and TourismUser groupsWork closely with city, county, state and tribal governments to provide for integrated, coordinated development and management (including enforcement) of OHV activities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Recreation and TourismEconomic considerationsState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismUser groupsState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismUser groupsState of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease opportunities for viewing mule deer while educating the public concerning the needs of deer and the importance of habitat and other limiting factors.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationProvide a diversity of high-quality hunting and viewing opportunities for mule deer throughout the state.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan20
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationResponsible recreation is promoted and encouraged via e?ective education and enforcement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan178
Recreation and TourismUser groupsRecreational opportunities (OHV) are designed and presented in ways that encourage and promote responsible participation, while also ensuring that wildlife and habitat impacts are kept at acceptably low levels.Utah Wildlife Action Plan177
Recreation and TourismProvide for an increase and diversity of quality and quantity recreational
experiences while: (1) Providing outdoors recreation opportunities for
all individuals; (2) Maintaining proper outdoor recreation standards of
open space; (3) Minimizing environmental degradation wherever possible.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)21
Recreation and TourismAn increasing number of users are accommodated within the capability of the resource by maintaining and improving existing developed recreation sites and emphasizing management of dispersed recreation.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan18-Feb
Recreation and TourismExisting developed campgrounds are maintained in their current locations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan18-Feb
Recreation and TourismDispersed recreation opportunities are offered in areas close to urban centers, with an emphasis on a full range of trail opportunities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan18-Feb
Recreation and TourismConcentrated dispersed recreation use is accommodated in designated corridors within resource capabilities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismOpportunities for non-motorized winter recreation activities are provided.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismAn expanded, exclusively non-motorized winter use trail system is provided in the Daniels Summit/Dock Flat area.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismThe Aspen Grove trailhead and parking lot on the Pleasant Grove Ranger District are managed to minimize conflicts between motorized and non-motorized winter recreation users.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismAn integrated trail system that provides a variety of recreational opportunities is identified through a trail travel management plan. This system incorporates the Great Western and Bonneville Shoreline Trails.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismA comprehensive, motorized trail system(s), to include use by non-street legal vehicles, is identified and designated on the Forest Travel Map and signed on the ground. Classified roads may be part of the all-terrain vehicle trail system.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismViable motorized winter use opportunities utilizing existing trails and play areas are maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismThe current level of summer special use activity is maintained, consistent with resource capability. Opportunities for winter special use activities are evaluated.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismOpportunities for heli-skiing are provided, consistent with the resource capability, other land uses, and other resource management goals.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismRecreation education and opportunity information is readily available to the public, and provided through a variety of communication methods.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan19-Feb
Recreation and TourismInterpretation and education opportunities are provided at strategic locations throughout the Forest including visitor centers, scenic byways and backways, campgrounds, trailheads, day-use areas, and the Diamond Fork Youth Forest. Themes include Leave No Trace, Tread Lightly, forest health, fire ecology, heritage resources, and unique features at specific sites. Through these opportunities, visitors gain an awareness and understanding of natural resources, natural resource management, and personal stewardship.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan24-Feb
Recreation and TourismDevelop and incorporate a non-motorized trail system into the future and existing infrastructure of Wasatch County to provide safe transportation and recreation facilities that are compatible with the rural and mountainous environments of Wasatch County.Wasatch County General Plan73
Recreation and TourismExisting public recreational facilities should be protected from development encroachments that would have an adverse impact on the recreational experience or its setting.Wasatch County General Plan79
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall evaluate proposed plans and actions for impacts on existing recreational activities.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall evaluate their plans and actions for potential future recreational activities.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall support the County in developing desirable recreation facilities including, but not limited to, hiking trails, camping opportunities, cross country skiing, snowmobiling, off-highway-vehicle (OHV) opportunities, biking and others as determined by the Wasatch Public Lands Committee.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismRecreational activities are compatible with resource development if properly planned and managed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismWasatch County encourages the joint development of Trail Corridors that create the maximum benefit to the recreation user.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismOff-highway vehicles should be used responsibly, and the management of off-highway vehicles should be uniform across jurisdictional boundaries. Laws related to the use of off-highway vehicles should be uniformly applied across all jurisdictions.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall provide opportunities for off-highway vehicle trails, roads or areas specifically designated by the land management agency for that purpose.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismMaintain or improve the quality and diversity of the recreation
experience at Deer Creek Reservoir. Provide a variety of recreational
opportunities, adequate facilities, and management that maintains or
enhances the quality of the recreation experience.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide opportunities and facilities for hiking, biking, camping, fishing,
bird watching, and other recreational pursuits.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide opportunities and facilities for hiking, biking, camping, fishing,
bird watching, and other recreational pursuits.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Recreation and TourismEvaluate the environmental impact of recreation activities on Deer
Creek Reservoir and surrounding lands. Manage recreation effects at
levels that compliment the setting.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide accessible experiences and facilities for persons with disabilities.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide for health and safety of the public.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Recreation and TourismProvide high-quality, visually appealing, accessible recreation
experience.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan5-Apr
Recreation and TourismProvide Appropriate Recreational FacilitiesJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan5-Apr
Recreation and TourismProvide for Safe, Quality Recreational Opportunities that
Minimize Conflicts
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan5-Apr
Recreation and TourismProvide up-to-date information regarding reservoir elevations,
usability of boat ramps and other park facilities, fishing rules and
regulations, rules and regulations governing safe use of the facilities,
etc. using resources such as internet, brochures, radio, pamphlets,
maps, etc.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan7-Apr
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasRiparian habitat in Central Utah Project-impacted reaches of Strawberry Valley streams, Sixth Water Creek, and lower Diamond Fork River is restored to desired conditions through mitigation activities conducted in cooperation and coordination with the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, the Department of the Interior, other federal and state agencies, and the public.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Riparian AreasHealthy, self-sustaining riparian communities, habitat for viable populations of aquatic life, and conditions for natural stream dynamics exist on the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Riparian AreasRecreation facilities (including trails and dispersed sites) are designed, constructed, and operated in a manner that does not retard or prevent attainment of aquatic Forest Plan management direction.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatEnhance an average of 25,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat in
Sage-grouse Management Areas annually.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatIncrease the total amount of sage-grouse habitat acreage within Sage-grouse Management Areas by an average of 50,000 acres per year, through management actions targeting Opportunity Areas. Opportunity Areas are areas which offer the best potential for creating new habitat for greater sage-grouse.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect 10,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat on private and School
and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) lands annually through conservation covenants, leases, easements or other legal tools, with emphasis on the best-of-the-best populations.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect, maintain, improve and enhance sage-grouse populations and habitats within the established Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viable [greater sage-grouse] populations within each SGMA.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilitySustain an average male lek count of 4100 males (based on a ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) in the Sage-grouse Management Areas, and increase the population of males to an average of 5000 (based on the same ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) within the Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatMaintain pollinators and minimize impacts to pollinators or their habitats.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationIncrease understanding of and support research on the distribution, ecology, and threats to plant species at risk, nonvascular plants and rare plant communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain or restore viability of populations of species at risk, Watch List Plants, and rare communitiesRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viability of species-at-risk (including endangered, threatened and sensitive species and unique communities).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityManage Forest Service sensitive species to prevent them from being classified as threatened or endangered and where possible provide for delisting as sensitive (FSM 2670).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticAquatic key habitats (especially at those locations important for SGCNs) contain su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem that supports the conservation target(s).Utah Wildlife Action Plan196
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticComplex habitats and ?oodplain connections are restored or maintained in selected rivers/streams.Utah Wildlife Action Plan199
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticEstablish water allocation policies protecting su?cient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem for aquatic key habitats (especially those with occurrences of SGCNs).Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticUtah Wildlife Action Plan198
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticUtah Wildlife Action Plan203
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticNatural hydrographs (timing, duration, temperature, etc) are restored or mimicked in priority stream reaches below dams and reservoirs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan205
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatUtah Wildlife Action Plan226
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatRecreational opportunities (OHV) are designed and presented in ways that encourage and promote responsible participation, while also ensuring that wildlife and habitat impacts are kept at acceptably low levels.Utah Wildlife Action Plan177
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationResponsible recreation is promoted and encouraged via e?ective education and enforcement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan178
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan5-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitats for native plants that provide nectar, pollen, and floral diversity throughout the active season for pollinator species are maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesParticipate in the development and implementation of a habitat management strategy for clay phacelia (Phacelia argillacea).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPotential habitat for clay phacelia (Phacelia argillacea) in the Spanish Fork Canyon area is managed to ensure quality habitat will be available in the future if it becomes necessary to introduce this species onto National Forest System lands to provide for its recovery.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan6-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan7-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain 20 percent of potential conifer habitat within each Lynx Analysis Unit (LAU) as high quality foraging habitat for Canada lynx.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHuman activities (including special uses, minerals exploration and development, and utility transmission corridor placement) are managed to minimize impacts on Canada lynx and their habitat.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitat for red squirrel (a Canada lynx alternate prey species) is provided and maintained within each Lynx Analysis Unit (LAU).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesNorthern goshawk habitat, represented by Vegetative Structural Stages (VSS) 4, 5, and 6, is provided and maintained in forested ecosystems.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain high or optimum value northern goshawk habitat conditions on at least 80 percent of known occupied territories.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain occupation and/or use of known active northern goshawk, boreal owl, and three-toed woodpecker nest sites during vegetation treatment project activities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesNo threatened and endangered species shall be proposed for listing in Wasatch County until verifiable scientific data has been made available to the public that there is a need for the designation that protections cannot be provided by other methods, and the area in question is truly unique compared to other area lands.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesBuffer zones for the protection of threatened and endangered species or other special designations are not acceptable.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesThe County does not believe that it is the intention of the Act to restore all original habitats once occupied by a specific species, but only the amount needed to protect the species from extinction.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesThese designations or reintroduction plans often grow beyond the stated boundaries and scope, and result in detrimental effects on the area economy, life style, culture and heritage. The Fish and Wildlife Service shall exclude areas from critical habitat designation if the economic damage is considered by the county as being too great.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesDesignation or reintroduction plans, guidelines, and protocols must not be developed or implemented without full County involvement and public disclosure.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAny analysis of proposed designations or reintroductions must be inclusive and analyze needed actions associated with the proposal to prevent growth beyond the scope and boundaries.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesRecovery plans must provide for indicators to track the effectiveness of the plan and identify the point at which recovery has been accomplished. Such designations shall provide access for reservoirs, maintenance of irrigation facilities, fire, and weed and pest control.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesOn BLM, National Forest, Utah Reclamation, Mitigation and Conservation Commission and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources lands within the Strawberry Greater Sage Grouse Management Areas in Wasatch County, the Greater Sage-grouse shall be managed in accordance with the 2013 State of Utah Conservation Plan for Greater Sage Grouse in Utah and any subsequent amendments thereto. On private, local government and SITLA lands within the sage grouse management areas, compliance with this plan is strictly voluntary. Wasatch County recognizes that federal law mandates coordinated planning with local government of federally managed lands and they support interaction and coordination with all Federal Agencies.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect sensitive resources and the natural environment.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect threatened and endangered plant and animal species and reduce
impacts to sensitive resources.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesIdentify areas of potential habitat for threatened, endangered, and
special status species.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatEnhance an average of 25,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat in
Sage-grouse Management Areas annually.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatIncrease the total amount of sage-grouse habitat acreage within Sage-grouse Management Areas by an average of 50,000 acres per year, through management actions targeting Opportunity Areas. Opportunity Areas are areas which offer the best potential for creating new habitat for greater sage-grouse.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect 10,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat on private and School
and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) lands annually through conservation covenants, leases, easements or other legal tools, with emphasis on the best-of-the-best populations.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect, maintain, improve and enhance sage-grouse populations and habitats within the established Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viable [greater sage-grouse] populations within each SGMA.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilitySustain an average male lek count of 4100 males (based on a ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) in the Sage-grouse Management Areas, and increase the population of males to an average of 5000 (based on the same ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) within the Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or improve water quality to provide stable and productive riparian and aquatic ecosystems.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore overall watershed health (proper functioning of physical, biological and chemical conditions). Provide for long term soil productivity. Watershed health should be addressed across administrative and political boundaries.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore stream channel integrity, channel processes, and sediment regimes (timing, volume, character of sediment input/transport) under which riparian & aquatic ecosystems developed.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain water in streams, lakes, and wetlands of adequate quantity and quality to provide for instream flows and existing downstream uses including support of healthy riparian & aquatic habitats, stability & effective function of stream channels, ability to route flood discharges, and to maintain recreation opportunities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsProtect waters meeting or surpassing State water quality standards by planning and designing land management activities to protect
water quality.
Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedDesign and implement watershed management programs and plans that will restore water quality and watershed function to support beneficial uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain and/or restore soil productivity to improve watershed functioning through managing ground cover, soil compaction, and vegetation.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedIdentify [watershed] areas not in properly functioning condition. Improve plant species composition, ground cover and age class diversity in these areas.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyUtah Wildlife Action Plan197
Water Quality and HydrologyImprove water quality in the Drain Tunnel Creek and McHenry Canyon drainages
by reducing the sulfate concentration from approximately 800 to 50
mg/l in McHenry Canyon, and from approximately 185 to 30 mg/l in Drain
Tunnel Creek.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)20
Water Quality and HydrologyWatersheds and their associated stream processes, channel stability, riparian resources, and aquatic habitats are maintained or restored toa functional condition.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan2-Feb
Water Quality and HydrologyUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan3-Feb
Water Quality and HydrologyUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan3-Feb
Water Quality and HydrologyAn aquatic macroinvertebrate rating of at least 80 percent of the potential Biotic Condition Index (BCI) or equivalent index is maintained for aquatic ecosystems on the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Water Quality and HydrologyAny proposed action must include an analysis of the effects on water quality, stream flow, the amount of water yields, and the timing of those yields. Any proposed action or non-action that results in a decrease in water quality, quantity, flow, or changes the timing of flows in a way that negatively affects water rights, shall be opposed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyAny proposed agency action must be analyzed for impacts on water resource and management facilities such as dams, reservoirs, delivery systems, culinary water supplies, and monitoring facilities, etc., located on or downstream from land covered by the proposal.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyLivestock grazing and other multiple uses are compatible with watershed management and shall be included in any analysis of projects proposed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyThe management of the watershed should allow for continued multiple use. It should preserve the quality and quantity of water as well as environmental values and allow the watershed to support existing and future uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyApply scientifically effective practices to maintain and improve the quality and quantity of desirable plant cover to protect watersheds, timber, and rangelands from soil erosion.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyEncourage and establish partnerships to help educate the public on the
purposes of the Deer Creek Reservoir, the importance of the watershed
and the public's role in maintaining water quality.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyParticipate in management efforts to maintain the water quality of Deer
Creek Reservoir.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect or improve Deer Creek Reservoir water integrity for storage,
quality and delivery. The importance of Deer Creek as a headwater of
the municipal water supply for the Wasatch Front metropolitan area is
reco gnized.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyAllow uses that maintain federal and state water quality standards or
improve the established water quality standards for Deer Creek
Reservoir.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyManage effectively to control sources of pollution.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
Water Quality and HydrologyPromote and support watershed best management practices to ensure
high quality water for all users and to meet designated beneficial uses
in the Provo River Watershed.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Apr
Water Quality and HydrologyIdentify water quality impacts coming from the Jordanelle Reservoir
Project Management Area and suggest ways to meet beneficial use
designations.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Apr
Water Quality and HydrologyContinue to operate Jordanelle Reservoir to meet primary project
purposes of delivering M&I and agricultural water and secondary
project purposes of recreation, fish and wildlife, flood control and
power, by honoring all existing and future contracts and agreements
with respect to water deliveries and operations.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Apr
Water Quality and HydrologyJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan4-Apr
Water RightsUtah Wildlife Action Plan197
Water RightsUinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan3-Feb
Water RightsWater rights held by the Forest are exercised and managed to meet Forest resource management needs and purposes. Federal water rights that are not needed are made available for purchase, lease, or exchange.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan3-Feb
Water RightsWater rights held by the Forest are protected to prevent their encumbrance by water right applications that injure or have the potential to injure National Forest water rights or resources.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan3-Feb
Water RightsUtah State Water Laws of Prior Appropriation Doctrine and Beneficial Use are recognized as the legal basis for perfecting all water rights for the use of all water within Wasatch County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsPrivately held water rights shall be protected from federal and/or state encroachment or coerced acquisition. Wasatch County shall oppose any movement toward nationalization or federal control of Utah water rights and resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsAny proposed sale, lease or exchange of water rights involving a public land management agency shall address the interests of Wasatch County, and such a sale must include appropriate mitigation.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsAll reasonable water conservation efforts shall be supported. Water conserved as a result of these efforts shall be allocated to those persons or entities whose efforts created savings, within the limits of their water rights.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsUtah Wildlife Action Plan197
WetlandsInvestigate Deer Creek Reservoir wetland to determine if they can be
used to reduce non-point source pollution.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan2-Mar
WetlandsProtect or enhance existing wetlands.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
WetlandsAllow wetland investigations to determine if they can be used to reduce
non-point source pollution.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
WetlandsIdentify sensitive riparian and wetland habitats and protect those
habitats in accordance with the Federal Clean Water Act and
Executive Order 11990.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
Wild and Scenic RiversEligible Wild and Scenic River corridors are managed to preserve their free-flowing character and outstandingly remarkable values until suitability can be determined.
a. Protection of suitable segments remains in effect until Congress acts to add the proposed segments to the Wild and Scenic Rivers System and a River Management Plan can be adopted.
b. If Congress determines that a suitable segment will not be designated, management reverts to the management prescription in effect for adjoining areas.
Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan24-Feb
Wild and Scenic RiversThe Uinta National Forest final inventory of rivers considered for inclusion into the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System identifies Little Provo Deer Creek as potentially eligible. The segment of river identified has no outstanding or remarkable value other than Cascade Springs itself. Wasatch County opposes inclusion of this segment for consideration in the Wild and Scenic Rivers System.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildernessManage Wildernesses recognizing differences in population proximity and consequent role in providing wilderness experiences for more people.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
WildernessWilderness area management protects biological and physical resources and wilderness values while accommodating recreation use.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan23-Feb
WildernessManage areas recommended for wilderness designation for non-impairment.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan23-Feb
WildernessWasatch County objects to any effort to manage National Forest System Lands as de facto wilderness management regimen through additional roadless or unroaded area reviews. Utah Wilderness Act of 1984 (P.L. No. 98-24) mandates repeatedly that all Utah Forest Service Land not designated as wilderness, shall be managed on the basis of Multiple Use Sustained Yield principles until such time, that Congress may designate additional wilderness. The Utah Wilderness Act places a moratorium forbidding the 2004 efforts for additional roadless area reviews.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeProtect resources essential to fish and wildlife habitats and populations.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
WildlifeProtect fish and wildlife habitat to the extent practicable within the
operational constraints of the reservoir.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan3-Mar
WildlifeCoordinate/consult with the Mitigation Commission, USFWS, and
UDWR regarding the current and future role of the West Hills WMA,
in achieving wildlife mitigation for the Bonneville Unit of CUP.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
WildlifeReview mitigation commitments made in the 1987 Wildlife
Management Plans and implement additional mitigation as necessary
as additional development occurs consistent with this RMP.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan6-Apr
WildlifeMaintain and improve big game wintering habitat in the Walsburg Game Range.Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)19
WildlifeHabitatEvaluate areas with potential for Research Natural Area designation including Ben Lomond Peak (tall forb values), western portion of the Deseret Peak Wilderness (Great Basin community types and cryptogamic crusts).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
WildlifeHabitatMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide adequate habitat components for sustainable big game populations coordinated with State wildlife management agencies, private lands and other resource needs and priorities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide suitable habitat for prey species such as hares, squirrels, and small mammals.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifePopulation managementProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WildlifeHabitatEvaluate areas with potential for Research Natural Area designation including Ben Lomond Peak (tall forb values), western portion of the Deseret Peak Wilderness (Great Basin community types and cryptogamic crusts).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
WildlifeHabitatMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide adequate habitat components for sustainable big game populations coordinated with State wildlife management agencies, private lands and other resource needs and priorities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide suitable habitat for prey species such as hares, squirrels, and small mammals.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
WildlifePopulation managementProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WildlifeHabitat-improvement projects often take a few years to pay off, but over the long term, this effort will result in healthier deer populations statewide.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment and Utah County Resource Assessment8
WildlifeAreas identified as being of special concern for habitat such as big game winter range, big game natal areas, Canada lynx denning areas, and greater sage grouse breeding areas in the Vernon and Strawberry Reservoir Management Areas are maintained and, where potential exists, improved or expanded. Disturbances in these areas are limited during critical periods for wildlife.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan9-Feb
WildlifeAdequate amounts and distribution of big game hiding and thermal cover are maintained. Adequate amounts of hiding cover for wildlife is retained around created openings and along roads where vegetative management activities are implemented.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
WildlifeMaintain stable and upward conditions in big game winter range habitats and improve downward trend sites.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
WildlifeWildlife travel corridors, riparian corridors, and key linkage routes are maintained and, where feasible, restored. Connections among large, contiguous blocks of suitable habitat are provided (e.g., key linkage routes for Canada lynx within and between Lynx Analysis Units [LAUs] and big game summer and winter range movements). Wildlife movement is facilitated within key linkage areas, considering highway crossing structures when feasible. Unified management direction is established through cooperation with other ownerships via habitat conservation plans, conservation easement or agreements, and land acquisitions.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan17
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan17-18
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan18
Fire ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan18
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan30-31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan31
WildlifeCoordination occurs with federal, tribal, and state wildlife management agencies to identify and manage wild ungulate impacts that prevent attainment of Forest Plan management direction.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan10-Feb
Water Quality and HydrologyUtah Forest Action Plan48
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan54
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan55
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan55
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan58
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan66
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsUtah Forest Action Plan68
Water Quality and HydrologyUtah Forest Action Plan72
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan73
WildlifeRaptor mortality associated with existing and proposed power lines is reduced (see Suggested Practices for Raptor Protection on Power Lines [Raptor Research Foundation 1996] or other applicable direction for guidance).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
Riparian AreasUtah Forest Action Plan73
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan73
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan74
Forest ManagementUtah Forest Action Plan76
AgriculturePrime, important and unique agricultural lands and soils are vital to sustain human life. The protection of prime agricultural lands should be given the same consideration as other lands by federal agencies, the State of Utah, and its political subdivisions. It is important these lands be conserved for our food security needs.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureDevelop legislative policy that provides protection for important agricultural lands and soils equal to wetlands in order to sustain food security.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureFund conservation easement legislation that gives priority to important productive agricultural lands with prime soils or important farmlands. Dedicate greenbelt rollback monies to conservation easements or other productive agricultural uses within the counties where rollback funds are generated. Enable local conservation districts to make recommendations to county commissions related to the use of annual rollback funds.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide new monies to the LeRay McAllister Fund to match funds for conservation easements on productive agricultural lands with prime state or locally-important soils.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureCreate a separate greenbelt designation for smaller-acreage productive operations.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAmend Utah law to fund mitigation of agriculture lands lost to eminent domain.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAmend Utah law to encourage energy producers to use directional drilling and other techniques to minimize the surface impacts on agricultural lands caused by energy development.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide a $1,000,000 increase in money from the State of Utah General Fund for invasive species mitigation, especially weed control.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureConsider other sources of funding for weed control tied to the spread of weed seeds including: funds earned from unclaimed property, trailer licenses, noxious weed impact fees from recreational ATVs, gravel pit fee assessments, a portion of the sportsmen fees gathered by the Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other appropriate sources.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide $1,000,000 of on-going state funding to increase landscape-scale coordinated resource management planning. Where feasible, this money will facilitate the development of grazing management plans, watering facilities, fencing improvements, weed control, and other grazing improvement projects.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAugment existing funding or develop alternative funding sources to improve and update irrigation system technologies.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureEnhance the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Big Game Depredation program to mitigate crop and other damages caused by big game to farm and ranch land.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureIncrease the capacity of the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food to directly participate in the planning of state and local infrastructure needs when agricultural lands are an issue.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAgriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureDevelop incubator kitchens in each county to provide small agricultural companies places to test new products.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureEncourage local governments to recognize the importance of agricultural land uses in their general plans, policies and ordinances.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage local governments to develop specialized local food security plans that work toward these goals.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgriculturePartner with USU Extension, conservation districts, county and city officials, and other interested parties to provide technical assistance for conservation.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage the federal government to eliminate subsidies for agriculture-related products diverted from the food supply for energy production.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureUrge the federal government to allow greater state agricultural environmental stewardship oversight using the traditional educational and voluntary programs of the USDA, conservation districts, and the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food as models.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureCreate federal block grants to fight invasive species on federal and state lands.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgriculturePass a resolution calling on Congress to create a new national agriculture guest worker program.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport federal legislation to provide funding for improved agriculture irrigation infrastructure.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureUpdate the inventory of invasive species in Utah, more clearly define the role of county weed boards in statute, and identify and prioritize weed control measures.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEstablish outreach and education campaigns to inform the public about how to minimize the spread of invasive species.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureAgriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureIncrease the funding and effectiveness of predator control, and allot reasonable and sufficient compensation to agricultural producers for wildlife impacts that may disrupt agricultural production.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport Utah House Bill 116: an ample, sustainable and legal workforce is critical for our farms and ranches.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureOppose using E-verification to verify worker status until federal guest worker laws are in place.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureWork with Utah State University and support groups to develop and implement planning and farm transfer programs that will complement retirement and insurance programs for farmers and ranchers.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport efforts to match farmers without identified successors, with young farmers seeking opportunities to purchase or lease farms or ranches.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage the financial community to finance farm ownership transfer.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureWork with conservation districts in a statewide effort to map Utah irrigation systems, and educate the general public about the irrigation needs of agriculture and the benefits of well-maintained irrigation delivery systems.Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
Fire ManagementEcologyIncrease the active use of fire to return fire dependent ecosystems to proper functioning and to reduce hazardous fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Fire ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Fire ManagementEcologyTake timely actions to restore proper functioning of ecosystems after wildfire.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Air QualityStandardsEnsure National Forest management activities result in meeting state and federal air quality standards, and comply with local, state and federal air quality regulations and requirements.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationFully integrate the Heritage Program into land and resource management.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationImplement the National Heritage Strategy emphasizing the need for non-project inventories (Section 110) and public education and awareness programs.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingInventory, evaluate, protect and enhance heritage sites and landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Fire ManagementPreparednessIncrease public understanding and support of the active use of fire to improve watershed and habitat conditions and reduce fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, silvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain and/or restore tall forb communities to mid seral or potential natural community (PNC) status.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore as mature and old age classes 40% of total conifer and 30% of total aspen cover types, well distributed across the landscape.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore species composition, such that the species that occupy any given site are predominantly native species in the kind and amount that were historically distributed across the landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Forest ManagementProductsUse timber harvest where allowed, to contribute to the economy while achieving properly functioning conditions of vegetation and watersheds.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Land AccessPlanningAcquire access and rights-of-way for general public and administrative use.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningMinimize the addition of special use encumbered areas of National Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land AccessPlanningProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land AccessRight of WayEfforts will be made to obtain right-of-ways for public access to the National Forest. Existing right-of ways will be maintained. A priority for right-of-ways will be the linkages to community trails along the front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-135
Land AccessRight of WayRegional trails, such as the Great Western Trail and the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will be recognized and valued as unique opportunities to develop recreation corridors across multiple ownerships in the face of expanding development across potential trail corridors.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-160
Land AccessRight of WayOgden area in cooperation with the cities of North Ogden, Pleasant View and Willard. Needed access and rights of way will be maintained or acquired to complete the Bonneville Shoreline trail along the Wasatch Front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-146
Land UseStandards/zoningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Land UseUtility corridorsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRecognize and manage for the importance of scenic forest landscapes to overall recreation settings as well as to the quality of life for communities adjacent to the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRestore, maintain or enhance landscape scenic integrity across the variety of landscape character themes found on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Law EnforcementIncrease Forest Service field presence in key areas, improve effectiveness of public information on restrictions, and increase participation of individuals and organized groups in monitoring uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Livestock and GrazingManage livestock grazing levels and operations on suitable lands for sustainable forage use within properly functioning conditions.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Noxious WeedsGreatly reduce known infestations of noxious weeds and rigorously prevent their introduction and/or spread.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Noxious WeedsRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Recreation and TourismCoordination/partnershipsInvolve Forest users in developing strategies for managing recreation to meet desired future conditions and address recreation pressures and demands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease Forest recreation user stewardship of resources and strengthen awareness of user ethics for reducing resource and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismParks/facilitiesEncourage private enterprise to develop recreational facilities on and off the Forest that provide for a range of recreation opportunities (e.g. camping and picnicking areas, trailheads, and interpretive sites).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage for an array of recreation opportunities and settings to improve the quality of life for a variety of Forest recreation users. Balance growth and expansion of recreation by managing within the capability of sustainable ecosystems found on the Forest for today and the future.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismTourismUse ski area associated private and public developed recreation facilities to provide world-class skiing and mountain resort opportunities while contributing to the economy.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-23
Recreation and TourismTrailsAcquire lands or easements needed to facilitate Bonneville Shoreline and Great Western Trails development.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-24
Recreation and TourismTrailsManage trails to provide desired recreation opportunities for recreation users and to meet Forest Service standards.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage recreation use of undeveloped areas on the forest to provide for desirable opportunities while preventing or reducing resource impacts and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage uses of new recreational technologies to provide for opportunities while preventing or minimizing negative social and/or resource impacts on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Recreation and TourismUser groupsWork closely with city, county, state and tribal governments to provide for integrated, coordinated development and management (including enforcement) of OHV activities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-21
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Riparian AreasRaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatMaintain pollinators and minimize impacts to pollinators or their habitats.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationIncrease understanding of and support research on the distribution, ecology, and threats to plant species at risk, nonvascular plants and rare plant communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain or restore viability of populations of species at risk, Watch List Plants, and rare communitiesRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viability of species-at-risk (including endangered, threatened and sensitive species and unique communities).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityManage Forest Service sensitive species to prevent them from being classified as threatened or endangered and where possible provide for delisting as sensitive (FSM 2670).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or improve water quality to provide stable and productive riparian and aquatic ecosystems.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore overall watershed health (proper functioning of physical, biological and chemical conditions). Provide for long term soil productivity. Watershed health should be addressed across administrative and political boundaries.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore stream channel integrity, channel processes, and sediment regimes (timing, volume, character of sediment input/transport) under which riparian & aquatic ecosystems developed.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain water in streams, lakes, and wetlands of adequate quantity and quality to provide for instream flows and existing downstream uses including support of healthy riparian & aquatic habitats, stability & effective function of stream channels, ability to route flood discharges, and to maintain recreation opportunities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsProtect waters meeting or surpassing State water quality standards by planning and designing land management activities to protect
water quality.
Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedDesign and implement watershed management programs and plans that will restore water quality and watershed function to support beneficial uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain and/or restore soil productivity to improve watershed functioning through managing ground cover, soil compaction, and vegetation.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedIdentify [watershed] areas not in properly functioning condition. Improve plant species composition, ground cover and age class diversity in these areas.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-17
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-18
WildernessManage Wildernesses recognizing differences in population proximity and consequent role in providing wilderness experiences for more people.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-25
WildlifeAvian mortality is reduced by minimizing the construction of tower facilities, including lighted towers, on communication sites.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
WildlifeMaintain active beaver colonies in at least 80 percent of 6th level Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) watersheds within each management area, except in the Vernon and West Sheeprock Management Areas on the Vernon Unit.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan11-Feb
WildlifeThe Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands intends to support the Division of Wildlife Resources in the Wildlife Action Plan strategies.Utah Forest Action Plan41
WildlifeUtah Forest Action Plan73
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Goal: Conserve, improve, and restore mule deer habitat throughout the state with
emphasis on crucial ranges.
Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan18
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Objective 1: Maintain mule deer habitat throughout the state by protecting and enhancing existing crucial habitats and mitigating for losses due to natural and human impacts.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan18
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Objective 2: Improve the quality and quantity of vegetation for mule deer on a minimum of 500,000 acres of crucial range by 2019.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan19
WildlifePopulation managementMaintain a hunting program for mule deer that encourages a variety of quality hunting opportunities while maintaining population objectives.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan20
WildlifePopulation managementPopulation Management Goal: Expand and improve mule deer populations throughout the state within the carrying capacity of available habitats and in consideration of other land uses.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan17
WildlifePopulation managementPopulation Objective: By 2019, increase mule deer populations within the state as conditions allow and bring all populations to their unit objective (currently (2014) 425,400).Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan17
WildlifeHabitatFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
WildlifeHabitatGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
WildlifeHabitatInappropriate Fire Frequency and Intensity - Fire is excluded from habitats in which potential burns now would be frequent, large, and destructive to soils and native vegetation to the habitats are being actively managed (treated) to reduce components or factors that promote risk of catastrophic ?re, such as cheatgrass, excessive conifer encroachment, or unnaturally large stands of mature Gambel oakUtah Wildlife Action Plan188
WildlifeHabitatNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
WildlifeHabitatOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
WildlifeWildlife management agencies, public land management agencies and the County shall work together to manage big game populations that are compatible with livestock grazing and are within the allocations set by the resource management plan.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeWildlife agencies shall find effective ways to mitigate and compensate landowners for damage caused by big game animals on private property. Wasatch County recognizes that the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is authorized by Utah Code to mitigate damage to agricultural crops, equipment and improvements, and that a process to do so is in place. (Utah Code section 23-16-4)Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeWildlife populations shall not be increased nor shall new species be introduced until forage allocations have been provided and an impact analysis completed analyzing the effects on other wildlife species, available habitat, and livestock.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeReduction in forage allocation resulting from forage studies, drought, or other natural disasters will be shared proportionately by wildlife, livestock and other uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeIncreases in forage allocation resulting from improved range conditions shall be shared proportionally by wildlife, livestock and other uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeWildlife target levels and/or populations must not exceed the forage assigned in the resource management plan forage allocations.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeResource-use and management decisions by federal land management and regulatory agencies should support state-sponsored initiatives or programs designed to stabilize wildlife populations that may be experiencing a scientifically proven decline in numbers.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeSet population objectives and manage elk populations at appropriate spatial scales that account for migration patterns.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeEstablish local advisory committees to review individual herd unit management plans when considering a change (increase or decrease) in the herd size objective.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeOn units where population decreases are necessary, UDWR will recommend short-term population objectives in unit management plans or increases in antlerless elk permits.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeUtilize antlerless harvest as the primary tool to manage elk populations within herd size objectives and to target specific areas where range concerns or depredation problems exist.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeProperly manage elk populations to minimize competition with mule deer on crucial mule deer range.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeIf drought related conditions and high elk densities are negatively impacting habitat, recommend additional antlerless elk permits at the August Wildlife Board meeting.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeDuring severe winters, aggressively use antlerless elk harvest (public hunters and DWR removal) to minimize conflicts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeConsider using over-the-counter cow elk permits to provide additional harvest and hunting pressure in areas of conflict.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeOn units over objective where cow harvest is difficult to obtain, allow for cow harvest using a general season muzzleloader bull elk permit (similar to general season archery elk hunt).Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEncourage innovative ideas from regional biologists to manage towards population objectives.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeMonitor all elk populations by helicopter survey on a three year rotational basis to evaluate herd size, calf production, herd composition, and habitat use, as conditions and budgets allow.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEvaluate herd size and population trends on an annual basis.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeImplement research studies where needed to close information gaps.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeContinue to support the interagency big game range trend study of crucial ranges throughout the state.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeMonitor range condition, utilization, and trends annually as manpower and budget allow.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
Predator ControlUtilize the Predator Management Policy where needed to help achieve objectives for elk populations, including the management of wolves if necessary.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeInvestigate and manage disease outbreaks that threaten elk populations including CWD and brucellosis.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifePromote management practices that minimize disease risks such as discouraging baiting/feeding, conducting CWD surveillance, and assisting Department of Agricultural in monitoring elk farms/ranches for compliance.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeFollow the emergency big game winter feeding policy, and avoid unnecessary feeding of elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeContinue to provide incentive programs for landowners that will encourage elk populations on private land such as the CWMU, Landowner Association, and Walk-In Access programs.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeAddress all depredation problems in a timely and efficient manner to increase landowner tolerance of elk populations in accordance with current laws, rules, and policies.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIdentify and support the acquisition of property (fee title or conservation easements) from willing sellers that would better accommodate current population numbers or allow for increased elk populations.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIdentify future habitat restoration projects with stakeholders.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIncrease tolerance of public land grazers not enrolled in a CWMU or LOA by conducting habitat projects that will benefit livestock and wildlife.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEducate the public on the use and validity of population modeling in wildlife management.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIncrease communication and understanding between UDWR and stakeholders regarding elk distributions, population estimates, hunt recommendations, and management decisions.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeOn units with high amounts of social conflict, create elk committees during unit plan revisions and/or hold open houses to obtain public input.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeEnforce existing laws that protect resources on public and private lands.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeCreate a private-lands-only permit to encourage and target cow elk harvest on private lands.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIncrease the number of general season cow elk a hunter may annually harvest, but only allow for 1 cow elk permit to be obtained through the public draw system.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeUse depredation permits and vouchers, public hunters, and/or UDWR removal to harvest resident elk on agricultural lands or where elk are creating conflicts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIssue antlerless-elk-control permits on units that are over objective, in areas with limited access, units with low population objectives, or where hunter crowding is an issue.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeCoordinate season dates and permit numbers to distribute elk appropriately within a hunt unit and to achieve adequate harvest in areas of concern.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeInvestigate an incentive program for landowners not enrolled in the CWMU or LOA programs to qualify for a special drawing for bull elk permits/vouchers based on cow harvest. This program should be used on units exceeding their population objective.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeReview and modify eligibility requirements for existing landowner incentive programs (LOA, CWMU, WIA) as needed to increase cow elk harvest and/or improve elk distribution during hunting seasons.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeSecure easements to increase hunter access to elk on public and private lands from willing participants.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeProvide information to educate counties, municipalities, and developers to promote zoning that benefits elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies and private landowners to properly manage and improve elk habitat, especially calving and wintering areas.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWork with state and federal land management agencies to use livestock as a management tool to enhance crucial elk ranges.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWatershed restoration initiative: Increase forage production by annually treating a minimum of 40,000 acres of elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies, conservation organizations, private landowners, and local leaders through the regional Watershed Restoration Initiative working groups to identify and prioritize elk habitats that are in need of enhancement or restoration.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeAcquire additional, important elk habitat from willing sellers to offset habitat loss.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSupport programs, such as conservation easements, that provide incentives to private landowners to keep prime elk habitat managed as rangeland.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeEducate the public on the value of the general license, conservation, and expo permits for funding elk habitat improvement projects.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeContinue to support the conservation permit and habitat enhancement programs that provide crucial funding for habitat improvement efforts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSeek to maintain less than 2 miles of roads per square mile within crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWork cooperatively with UDOT, county, state, and federal agencies to limit the impacts of roads on elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSupport the establishment of multi-agency OHV plans developed on a county or planning unit level to prevent resource damage and protect crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies and energy development proponents to develop an effective mitigation approach for oil, gas, and mining proposals and large scale developments (e.g., solar, wind, and recreation) which have the potential to impact crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeEncourage energy development companies to avoid and minimize the impact of disturbance and use Best Management Practices that promote the conservation of wildlife resources.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
Noxious WeedsWork with land management agencies and county weed boards to control the spread of noxious and invasive weeds throughout the range of elk in Utah.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
Noxious WeedsThe Goal of the Wasatch County Weed Board is to further our efforts through the county coordinator and weed area CWMA programs to work with the several agencies within the county for the purpose of control and containment of the spread of noxious weeds. Our goal also is to guide and assist the private land owners to control weeds on their lands.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County7
Noxious WeedsPrevention, early detection, control and eradication of noxious weed species are the most practical means of weed management. Prevention is best accomplished by ensuring that new weed species seed or vegetative reproductive plant parts are not introduced into an area.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County13
Noxious WeedsAwareness of noxious weeds and the problems they cause will help the general public to understand why a long-term program is important for Wasatch County.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County10
Noxious WeedsEducation concerning the impact of noxious weeds to the flora and fauna of the area is an important facet of any long-term weed management plan developed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County10
Noxious WeedsDevelop early detection methods and eradication programs for new invaders. This would include education and awareness programs where visitors and users of the area assist managers in locating and identifying new invasive weed species.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County14
Noxious WeedsProvide follow-up inspection to verify potential of new invasive weed species. Initiate an eradication program if new species are confirmed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County14
Noxious WeedsEnsure that seed, feed grains, hay, straw or mulch are free of weed reproductive plant parts that are used in the county.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County14
Noxious WeedsEncourage proper management of livestock used in or trailed through the county to slow noxious weed spread.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County15
Noxious WeedsEnsure that equipment or vehicles are free of weed reproductive plant parts prior to movement into and out of the county.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County15
Noxious WeedsEducate people to the variety of seed transport methodsCoordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County16
Noxious WeedsWork with the county and city planning staff and zoning committees to include consideration for noxious weed management when developing or approving subdivision plans, special use permits, or new leases.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County16
Noxious WeedsDevelop an Integrated Weed Management Program including mechanical, herbicide, biological and revegetation whereby all landowners within the county are working in a cooperative program that prevents weeds from producing seed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County16
Noxious WeedsDevelop weed-awareness programs for local residents, fishing and hunting license holders, the visiting public, and staff members of the different county, state, and federal agencies.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsThrough the County Weed Management Area (CWMA) programs every effort available will be used to help prevent the introduction of new weed infestations into the area and for the control of present infestations.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsFire suppression results in the disturbance of land surface by vehicles, foot traffic, packstock, chemicals, helicopter buckets, bulldozers, fire line explosives, pumps, and hand tools. Fire rehabilitation practices may include seeding the fire lines or burned areas, care needs to be taken that seed mixes are free of noxious weed seed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsPlanning before fires occur can mitigate the impacts of noxious weeds during and after fire suppression activities.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsCreate a County Ordinance that prevents landscaping with invasive (noxious weeds) for ornamental purposes.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County18
WildlifeEstimate current population size and evaluate population trends; estimate amount and condition of habitat.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify research needs and knowledge gaps.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeDetermine population and habitat needs for the future.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify and discuss threats that have potential to impact sage-grouse in Morgan and Summit Counties, especially those associated with the five USFWS Listing Factors.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIncorporate management strategies from state and federal agency partners, local governments, and established rangewide conservation and management.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIncrease effective communication with all potential stakeholders in Morgan and Summit Counties and the state of Utah, through outreach, information distribution, and education.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeAddress and prioritize threats to aid in prioritizing management solutions.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify and pursue funding sources, or support partners in their pursuance of funding for projects that will help achieve specific strategies and actions.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3